gera

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See also: Gera and géra

Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse gera, gøra, gørva, from Proto-Germanic *garwijaną.

Verb[edit]

gera (third person singular past indicative gjørdi, third person plural past indicative gjørdu, supine gjørt)

  1. to do, to make
Conjugation[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Danish gære, from German gären.

Verb[edit]

gera (third person singular past indicative geraði, third person plural past indicative gerað, supine gerað)

  1. to ferment, to brew
Conjugation[edit]

Icelandic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gera, gøra, gørva, from Proto-Germanic *garwijaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gera (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative gerði, supine gert)

  1. (transitive, governs the accusative) to do
    Hvað ertu að gera?
    What are you doing?
    Letingjar gera aldrei neitt.
    Loafers never do anything.
  2. (transitive, governs the accusative) to make
  3. to arbitrate, to determine
  4. (impersonal) used with nouns denoting a weather condition to indicate that that type of weather is going on
    Það gerði rigningu.
    It rained.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Kikuyu[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gera (infinitive kũgera)

  1. to count, to measure, to reckon[1]
    Mũndũ ageraga maimwo, ndageraga maheo.One counts refusals, does not count gifts.[2]
  2. to pass through
    Ĩgĩtithia gwĩciiria njĩra ĩrĩa ĩĩkũgera.[The hyena (hiti)] stopped to consider which road he was going to take.[3]

Derived terms[edit]

(Nouns)

References[edit]

  1. ^ “gera” in Benson, T.G. (1964). Kikuyu-English dictionary, p. 108. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  2. ^ Cagnolo, C. (1933). The Akikuyu: Their Customs, Traditions and Folklore, p. 220. Nyeri, Kenya: Akikuyu in the Mission Printing School.
  3. ^ Armstrong, Lilias E. (1940). The Phonetic and Tonal Structure of Kikuyu, pp. 302–303. Rep. 1967. (Also in 2018 by Routledge).

Anagrams[edit]


Lithuanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gerà

  1. positive feminine singular nominative form of geras.
  2. positive feminine singular instrumental form of geras.

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin glarea.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒɛra/, /d͡ʒera/

Noun[edit]

gera

  1. gravel

Luang[edit]

Noun[edit]

gera

  1. (Moa) water

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Leti (2004, →ISBN, page 29 (comparative wordlist)

Old Norse[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *garwijaną (to prepare). Cognate with Old English gearwian, Old Saxon garwian, gerwian, Old High German garawen.

Verb[edit]

gera (singular past indicative gerði, plural past indicative gørðu, past participle gerðr)

  1. to do, make

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Danish: gøre
  • Elfdalian: djärå
  • English: gar
  • Faroese: gera
  • Icelandic: gera
  • Norwegian Bokmål: gjøre
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: gjera
  • Old Swedish: gøra, gæra, giora
  • Scots: gar
  • Westrobothnian: gjera

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

gera

  1. third-person singular present indicative of gerar
  2. second-person singular imperative of gerar

Tagalog[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Spanish guerra

Noun[edit]

gera

  1. war

See also[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Verb[edit]

gera

  1. third-person singular imperfect indicative of èser
  2. third-person plural imperfect indicative of èser

Westrobothnian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gera (preterite & supine gera)

  1. (intransitive) To steam, perspire strong heat from glow, smoke.[1]
  2. (intransitive) To emit heat, burn, sting.[1]

Noun[edit]

gera

  1. Steam, sauna or oven fumes.[1]
  2. Heartburn.[1]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

gera

  1. Alternative spelling of gjera

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Rietz, Johan Ernst, “Gera”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 191