geta

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Geta, getą, gęta, and ge-tà

English[edit]

Geta
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese 下駄 (geta).

Noun[edit]

geta (plural getas or geta)

  1. A Japanese raised wooden clog, worn with traditional Japanese garments such as the kimono.
    • 1963 March 16, Hal Porter, “Little old lady passing by”, in The Bulletin, page 22, column 3:
      Because of August he wears shorts and sandals, the Japanese geta sort called thongs.
    • 1982 July, Robert Dillon, Geta As A Karate Training Tool, Black Belt, page 70,
      The Japanese geta or wooden sandal is a superb, though little-utilized, tool for training in the martial arts. [] The geta are flat, wooden sandals raised on vertical slats.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse geta (whence also English get), from Proto-Germanic *getaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed- (take, seize). Compare Danish gide, Swedish gitta.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈcɛːta/ (
    (file)
    )
  • Rhymes: -ɛːta

Verb[edit]

geta (strong verb, third-person singular past indicative gat, third-person plural past indicative gátum, supine getað/getið)

  1. (auxiliary verb) to be able
    Getur þú sagt mér hvar Bláa Lónið er.
    Can you tell me where the Blue Lagoon is.
  2. (only in elevated speech) to father, to beget
    • Genesis 5:3 (Icelandic, English)
      Adam lifði hundrað og þrjátíu ár. Þá gat hann son í líking sinni, eftir sinni mynd, og nefndi hann Set.
      When Adam had lived 130 years, he had a son in his own likeness, in his own image; and he named him Seth.

Conjugation[edit]

Usage notes[edit]
  • Geta (1) requires the supine (sagnbót) form of an accompanying verb, rather than the bare infinitive.
    • Incorrect: Ég get ekki segja þér hvers vegna.
    • Correct: Ég get ekki sagt þér hvers vegna.
      • I cannot tell you why.
  • The supine of geta (1) is getað, the supine of geta (2) is getið
    • Hann hefur ekki getað talað við son sinn.
      • He has not been able to speak with his son
    • Hann hefur getið son.
      • He has begotten a son.


Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

geta f (genitive singular getu, nominative plural getur)

  1. ability

Declension[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Malay geta, from Persian کت(kat, throne).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ɡəˈta]
  • Hyphenation: gê‧ta

Noun[edit]

gêta (plural, first-person possessive getaku, second-person possessive getamu, third-person possessive getanya)

  1. (Classical Indonesian) throne.
    Synonyms: takhta, singgasana

Further reading[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

geta

  1. Rōmaji transcription of げた
  2. Rōmaji transcription of ゲタ

Malay[edit]

Noun[edit]

geta

  1. dais, throne

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *getaną.

Verb[edit]

geta (singular past indicative gat, plural past indicative gátu, past participle getinn)

  1. (transitive, with accusative) to get
  2. (transitive, with genitive) to guess

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Danish: gide
  • Middle English: geten
  • Faroese: gita
  • Icelandic: geta
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: gjeta, gjete, gjette
  • Swedish: gitta

References[edit]

  • geta in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Phuthi[edit]

Verb[edit]

-geta

  1. to add

Inflection[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese 下駄 (geta).

Pronunciation 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

geta f (plural getas)

  1. (clothing) geta.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin Geta, from Ancient Greek Γέτης (Gétēs).

Pronunciation 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

geta m or f (plural getas)

  1. (demonym) Geat.