niin

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Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The instructive case of ne (they (things and animals)).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈniːn/, [ˈniːn]
  • IPA(key): /ˈniː/, [ˈniː] (colloquial)
  • Rhymes: -iːn
  • Syllabification: niin

Adverb[edit]

niin

  1. so, then, in that case
  2. so, to this or that extent
  3. like that, in that way, so (in a way that the speaker does not directly show)
  4. very (to a great extent; especially when used emphatically or when talking about how one feels)
    Tuo on niin kaunis!
    That is so beautiful!

Usage notes[edit]

  • Niin as an answer often has an additional meaning of "of course". As in the example, the interrogative suffix -ko/kö is usually attached to the point of the question.
  • In spoken, colloquial Finnish, it is common for the final n to be silent (i.e. pronounced as nii)

Derived terms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

niin

  1. (coordinating) then; used to introduce the main clause after if clause
    Jos yöllä on selkeää, niin tulee kova pakkanen.
    If it's clear at night, then it'll be heavy frost.
  2. (~ kuin) as well as
    niin siellä kuin täälläin there as well as in here

Usage notes[edit]

  • When used in conjunction with jos (if), niin can often be omitted when no emphasis is desired.

Interjection[edit]

niin

  1. yes, yeah (especially when asked to confirm something)
  2. right (either indicating agreement or having no opinion)

Pronoun[edit]

niin

  1. Instructive form of ne.

Ingrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finno-Permic *nine. Cognates with Finnish niini.

Noun[edit]

niin (genitive niinen, partitive niint)

  1. bast

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

niin

  1. Rōmaji transcription of にいん

Ojibwe[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

niin (Syllabics: ᓃᓐ)

  1. first-person singular pronoun: I, me
    Gegaa gii-pizikawaa anishaa go niin gaa-ikowebinag.:
    She would have been almost run over if it hadn't been for me pushing her out of the way.

Usage notes[edit]

Unlike in English, the first person is often expressed in Ojibwe by adding the personal prefix ni- and a corresponding suffix to the verb. The indepedent personal pronoun niin is often use to express emphasis or contrast, or when there is no verb in the sentence.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]