pote

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English poten, from Old English potian ‎(to push, thrust, strike, butt, goad), from Proto-Germanic *putōną ‎(to stab, push, poke). Cognate with Dutch poten ‎(to plant), Norwegian pota ‎(to poke). More at put.

Noun form from the word for paw in either Middle Dutch (poot, pote), Middle Low German (pōte), or Middle French (pote).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pote ‎(third-person singular simple present potes, present participle poting, simple past and past participle poted)

  1. (obsolete) To push, thrust.
  2. To poke (with a stick etc.).

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote ‎(plural potes)

  1. (obsolete) An animal's paw's fur or the animal's paw itself.
    • 1398, James Hamilton Wylie, “Appendix A: Duchy of Lancaster Records”, in History of England under Henry the Fourth[2], volume 4, London: Longmans, Green, and Co., published 1898, page 173:
      Fur Potes de Calabr'.
    • 1420, City of London (England). Corporation, Calendar of Plea and Memoranda Rolls Preserved Among the Archives of the Corporation of the City of London at the Guild-hall[3], volume 1413-1437, The University Press, published 1943, page 75:
      One gown of blue colour furred with potes of calabre, 28
    • 1481, William Carton, “68: Godfrey is wounded by a Bear.”, in Mary Noyes Colvin, PhD. editor, Godeffroy of Boloyne; or, The siege and conqueste of Jerusalem[4], London: Published for the Early English Text Society by Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., translation of original by William of Tyre, published 1893, page 113:
      ... the beeste ... embraced hym with his potes, or feet to fore, ...
    • 1497, “Will of R. Burton”, in Susan Flood editor, St. Albans Wills 1471-1500[5], Hertfordshire Record Society, published 1993, page 141:
      My wife's blewe gowne engrayned furred with powtes.
    • 1612, Andrew Halyburton, “On Imports”, in Cosmo Nelson Innes editor, Ledger of Andrew Halyburton 1492-1503[6], published 1867, Book of Customs and Valuation of Merchandises, Anno. 1612, page 306:
      Foynes—backes the dozen ... tailes the pane or mantle ... powtes the hundreth

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote c (singular definite poten, plural indefinite poter)

  1. paw

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pote

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of poten

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortening of poteau.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m, f ‎(plural potes)

  1. (informal) mate (UK), buddy (US)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trésor de la Langue française informatisée, s.v. "pote" : retrieved 2 June 2013, [1].

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French apporter ‎(bring). 

Verb[edit]

pote

  1. bring

Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pote

  1. present of poter
  2. imperative of poter

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

pōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of pōtus

Madurese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(ma-)putiq.

Adjective[edit]

pote

  1. white (bright and colourless)

Noun[edit]

pote

  1. white (colour)

Portuguese[edit]

pote

Etymology[edit]

From French pot ‎(pot), from Middle French pot, from Old French pot ‎(pot), from Vulgar Latin pottum, pottus ‎(pot, jar), from Proto-Germanic *puttaz ‎(pot, jar, tub), from Proto-Indo-European *budn- ‎(a kind of vessel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m (plural potes)

  1. pot (container)

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m ‎(plural potes)

  1. pot
  2. stew

Swahili[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pote

  1. Pa class inflected form of -ote.

Adverb[edit]

pote

  1. everywhere