pote

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Pote, poté, potè, Poté, and pote'

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English poten, from Old English potian (to push, thrust, strike, butt, goad), from Proto-Germanic *putōną (to stab, push, poke). Cognate with Dutch poten (to plant), Norwegian Nynorsk pota (to poke). More at put.

Verb[edit]

pote (third-person singular simple present potes, present participle poting, simple past and past participle poted)

  1. (obsolete) To push, thrust.
  2. To poke (with a stick etc.).
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote

  1. plural of poot

Bourguignon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin porta.

Noun[edit]

pote f (plural potes)

  1. door

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote c (singular definite poten, plural indefinite poter)

  1. paw

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

pote

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of poten

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of poteau.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m or f (plural potes)

  1. (informal) mate (UK), buddy (US)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trésor de la Langue française informatisée, s.v. "pote" : retrieved 2 June 2013, [1].

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Pote ("pot")

Etymology 1[edit]

15th century. Probably borrowed from Old French pot,[1] from Proto-Germanic *puttaz (pot, jar, tub), from Proto-Indo-European *budn- (a kind of vessel). Doublet of pota.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m (plural potes)

  1. (cooking) pot
    • 1457, Fernando R. Tato Plaza (ed.), Libro de notas de Álvaro Pérez, notario da Terra de Rianxo e Postmarcos. Santiago: Concello da Cultura Galega, page 182:
      Gomes de Sespooõ diso que nõ sabía máis, saluo que posera en súa casa Martj́n de Dorrõ hũu pote e que despoys fora por el e o leuara
      Gomez of Cespón said that he know nothing, except that Martin of Dorrón left a pot in his house, but that later he came for it and took it away
  2. (cooking) a three feet iron container with lid
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *pūto (swollen). Compare English pout.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m (plural potes)

  1. bump or swelling in the head caused by a injury
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • pote” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • pote” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • pote” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • pote” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • pote” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997). Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico. Madrid: Gredos, s.v. bote I.

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French apporter (bring).

Verb[edit]

pote

  1. bring

Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pote

  1. present of poter
  2. imperative of poter

Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

pote

  1. Archaic form of può, third-person singular present indicative of potere

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

pōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of pōtus

References[edit]

  • pote in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pote in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Madurese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(ma-)putiq.

Adjective[edit]

pote

  1. white (bright and colourless)

Noun[edit]

pote

  1. white (colour)

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unknown.

Noun[edit]

pôte m or f

  1. paw, claw
    Synonym: voet

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • pote”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • pote (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch pote, from Old Dutch *pota, related to Middle Low German pōte and Middle French pote (< Germanic) More at English paw.

Noun[edit]

pote (plural potes)

  1. An animal's paw's fur or the animal's paw itself.
    • 1398, James Hamilton Wylie, “Appendix A: Duchy of Lancaster Records”, in History of England under Henry the Fourth[2], volume 4, London: Longmans, Green, and Co., published 1898, page 173:
      Fur Potes de Calabr'.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1420, City of London (England). Corporation, Calendar of Plea and Memoranda Rolls Preserved Among the Archives of the Corporation of the City of London at the Guild-hall[3], volume 1413-1437, The University Press, published 1943, page 75:
      One gown of blue colour furred with potes of calabre, 28
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1481, William Carton, “68: Godfrey is wounded by a Bear.”, in Mary Noyes Colvin, PhD., editor, Godeffroy of Boloyne; or, The siege and conqueste of Jerusalem[4], London: Published for the Early English Text Society by Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., translation of original by William of Tyre, published 1893, page 113:
      [] the beeste [] embraced hym with his potes, or feet to fore, []
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1497, “Will of R. Burton”, in Susan Flood, editor, St. Albans Wills 1471-1500[5], Hertfordshire Record Society, published 1993, page 141:
      My wife's blewe gowne engrayned furred with powtes.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote

  1. Alternative form of pot

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m (definite singular poten, indefinite plural poter, definite plural potene)

  1. paw

Portuguese[edit]

pote

Etymology[edit]

From French pot (pot), from Middle French pot, from Old French pot (pot), from Vulgar Latin pottum, pottus (pot, jar), from Proto-Germanic *puttaz (pot, jar, tub), from Proto-Indo-European *budn- (a kind of vessel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m (plural potes)

  1. pot (container)

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Catalan pot (container), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *puttaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m (plural potes)

  1. pot
  2. stew

Swahili[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pote

  1. Pa class inflected form of -ote.

Adverb[edit]

pote

  1. everywhere

Tarantino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French poche

Noun[edit]

pote

  1. pocket