puke

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See also: puķe and puķē

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

1581, first mention is the derivative pukishness ‎(the tendency to be sick frequently). In 1600, "to spit up, regurgitate", recorded in the Seven Ages of Man speech in Shakespeare's As You Like It. Perhaps ultimately from Proto-Germanic *pukaną ‎(to spit, puff), from Proto-Indo-European *bew- ‎(to blow, swell). If so, then cognate with German pfauchen, fauchen ‎(to hiss, spit). Compare also Dutch spugen ‎(to spit, spit up), German spucken ‎(to spit, puke, throw up), Old English spīwan ‎(to vomit, spit). More at spew.

Noun[edit]

puke ‎(countable and uncountable, plural pukes)

  1. (uncountable) vomit.
    • 2007, The Guardian, The Guardian Science blog, "The latest in the war on terror: the puke saber"
      the puke saber [...] pulses light over rapidly changing wavelengths, apparently inducing "disorientation, nausea and even vomiting"
  2. (countable) A drug that induces vomiting.
  3. (countable) A worthless, despicable person.
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Verb[edit]

puke ‎(third-person singular simple present pukes, present participle puking, simple past and past participle puked)

  1. (transitive and intransitive) To vomit; to throw up; to eject from the stomach.
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Etymology 2[edit]

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Adjective[edit]

puke ‎(not comparable)

  1. A fine grade of woolen cloth
    1599, William Shakespeare, 1 Henry IV, ii.4
    • Puke-stocking caddis garter
  2. A very dark, dull, brownish-red color.

References[edit]

  • wollencloth: Word Detective
  • The Universal Dictionary of English, 1896, 4 vols: "Of a dark colour, said to be between black and russet."

Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English book, from Middle English book, from Old English bōc, from Proto-Germanic *bōks ‎(beech, book), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵos ‎(beech).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

puke

  1. book

References[edit]

  • Hawaiian Dictionary, by Pukui and Elbert

Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian, from Proto-Austronesian (compare Fijian buke, Hiligaynon bukid ‎(mountain), Indonesian bukit, Malay bukit, Waray-Waray bukid ‎(mountain)).

Noun[edit]

puke

  1. hill

Tagalog[edit]

Noun[edit]

puke

  1. vagina, female reproductive system.

Synonyms[edit]