sash

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Girl wearing a red sash (painting by Maria Matilda Brooks)
Dutch governor general wearing a yellow sash (painting by Cornelis Kruseman)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sæʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æʃ

Etymology 1[edit]

From Arabic شَاش(šāš, muslin cloth).

Noun[edit]

sash (plural sashes)

  1. A piece of cloth designed to be worn around the waist.
    Synonyms: belt, cummerbund, obi, waistband
  2. A decorative length of cloth worn over the shoulder to the opposite hip, often for ceremonial or other formal occasions.
  3. (obsolete) Alternative spelling of shash (the scarf of a turban)
    • 1650, Thomas Fuller, “The Land of Moriah”, in A Pisgah Sight of Palestine and the Confines thereof; with the History of the Old and New Testament Acted thereon. [], London: William Tegg, published 1869, OCLC 729957916, book II, paragraph 24, page 279:
      So much for the silk in Judea, called shesh in Hebrew, whence haply that fine linen or silk is called sashes, worn at this day about the heads of eastern people.
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Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

sash (third-person singular simple present sashes, present participle sashing, simple past and past participle sashed)

  1. (transitive) To adorn with a sash.
    • 1796, Edmund Burke, Letters on a Regicide Peace, Letter IV to the Earl Fitzwilliam, in The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, London: C. and J. Rivington, 1826, Volume 9, p. 46,[2]
      [] the Costume of the Sans-culotte Constitution of 1793 was absolutely insufferable [] but now they are so powdered and perfumed, and ribanded, and sashed and plumed, that [] there is something in it more grand and noble, something more suitable to an awful Roman Senate, receiving the homage of dependant Tetrarchs.

Etymology 2[edit]

From sashes, from French châssis (frame (of a window or door)), taken as a plural and -s trimmed off by the late 17th century.[1] See also chassis.

Woman and boy standing at an open sash window

Noun[edit]

sash (plural sashes)

  1. The opening part (casement) of a window usually containing the glass panes, hinged to the jamb, or sliding up and down as in a sash window. [circa 1680]
  2. (software, graphical user interface) A draggable vertical or horizontal bar used to adjust the relative sizes of two adjacent windows.
    Synonym: splitter
  3. (sawmilling) The rectangular frame in which the saw is strained and by which it is carried up and down with a reciprocating motion; the gate.
  4. (chemistry) A window-like part of a fume hood which can be moved up and down in order to create a barrier between chemicals and people.
    • 1915 April, W. A. Hamor, “Description of the New Building of the Mellon Institute”, in The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry[5], page 334:
      Each hood is equipped with two sliding sashes, glazed with polished plate wire-glass; []
    • 2008, Kenneth L. Williamson; Katherine M. Masters, Macroscale and Microscale Organic Experiments[6], published 2015, →ISBN, page 35:
      [] it [fume hood] also affords an excellent physical barrier on all four sides of a reacting system when the sash is pulled down.
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Verb[edit]

sash (third-person singular simple present sashes, present participle sashing, simple past and past participle sashed)

  1. (transitive) To furnish with a sash.
    • 1741, Samuel Richardson, Pamela, London, Volume 3, Letter 1, p. 2,[7]
      The old Bow-windows he will have preserv'd, but will not have them sash’d,
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