sash

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Girl wearing a red sash (painting by Maria Matilda Brooks)
Dutch governor general wearing a yellow sash (painting by Cornelis Kruseman)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sæʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æʃ

Etymology 1[edit]

From Arabic شَاش(šāš, muslin cloth).

Noun[edit]

sash (plural sashes)

  1. A piece of cloth designed to be worn around the waist.
    Synonyms: belt, cummerbund, obi, waistband
  2. A decorative length of cloth worn over the shoulder to the opposite hip, often for ceremonial or other formal occasions.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

sash (third-person singular simple present sashes, present participle sashing, simple past and past participle sashed)

  1. (transitive) To adorn with a sash.
    • 1796, Edmund Burke, Letters on a Regicide Peace, Letter IV to the Earl Fitzwilliam, in The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, London: C. and J. Rivington, 1826, Volume 9, p. 46,[2]
      [] the Costume of the Sans-culotte Constitution of 1793 was absolutely insufferable [] but now they are so powdered and perfumed, and ribanded, and sashed and plumed, that [] there is something in it more grand and noble, something more suitable to an awful Roman Senate, receiving the homage of dependant Tetrarchs.

Etymology 2[edit]

[circa 1680] From sashes, from French châssis (frame (of a window or door)), taken as a plural and -s trimmed off by the late 17th century.[1] See also chassis.

Woman and boy standing at an open sash window

Noun[edit]

sash (plural sashes)

  1. The opening part (casement) of a window usually containing the glass panes, hinged to the jamb, or sliding up and down as in a sash window.
    • 1722, Daniel Defoe, The Fortunes and Misfortunes of Moll Flanders, London: W. Chetwood and T. Edling, p. 91,[3]
      One Morning he pulls off his Diamond Ring, and writes upon the Glass of the Sash in my Chamber this Line, You I Love, and you alone.
    • 1823, Clement Clarke Moore, “Account of a Visit from St. Nicholas” (“The Night before Christmas”),[4]
      Away to the window I flew like a flash,
      Tore open the shutters, and threw up the sash.
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, chapter 2, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299:
      "In judging of that tempestuous wind called Euroclydon,” says an old writer—of whose works I possess the only copy extant—“it maketh a marvellous difference, whether thou lookest out at it from a glass window where the frost is all on the outside, or whether thou observest it from that sashless window, where the frost is on both sides, and of which the wight Death is the only glazier."
    • 1908, Arnold Bennett, The Old Wives’ Tale, Book 4, Chapter 2,[5]
      She chiefly recalled the Square under snow; cold mornings, and the coldness of the oil-cloth at the window, and the draught of cold air through the ill-fitting sash (it was put right now)!
  2. (software, graphical user interface) A draggable vertical or horizontal bar used to adjust the relative sizes of two adjacent windows.
    Synonym: splitter
  3. In a sawmill, the rectangular frame in which the saw is strained and by which it is carried up and down with a reciprocating motion; the gate.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sash (third-person singular simple present sashes, present participle sashing, simple past and past participle sashed)

  1. (transitive) To furnish with a sash.
    • 1741, Samuel Richardson, Pamela, London, Volume 3, Letter 1, p. 2,[6]
      The old Bow-windows he will have preserv'd, but will not have them sash’d,
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]