snag

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See also: SNAG

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsnæɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Etymology 1[edit]

From earlier snag (stump or branch of a tree), from Middle English *snagge, *snage, from Old Norse snagi (clothes peg) (compare Old Norse snag-hyrndr (snag-horned, having jagged corners)), perhaps ultimately from a derivative of Proto-Germanic *snakk-, *snēgg, variations of *snakaną (to crawl, creep, wind about).

Compare Norwegian snag, snage (protrusion; projecting point), Icelandic snagi (peg). Also see Dutch snoek (pike).[1]

Noun[edit]

snag (plural snags)

  1. A stump or base of a branch that has been lopped off; a short branch, or a sharp or rough branch.
    Synonyms: knot, protuberance
    • 1697, Virgil, “The Ninth Book of the Æneis”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      The coat of arms / Now on a naked snag in triumph borne.
  2. A dead tree that remains standing.
  3. A tree, or a branch of a tree, fixed in the bottom of a river or other navigable water, and rising nearly or quite to the surface, by which boats are sometimes pierced and sunk.
  4. (by extension) Any sharp protuberant part of an object, which may catch, scratch, or tear other objects brought into contact with it.
  5. A tooth projecting beyond the others; a broken or decayed tooth.
    • 1718, Mat[thew] Prior, “Alma: Or, The Progress of the Mind”, in Poems on Several Occasions, London: [] Jacob Tonson [], and John Barber [], OCLC 5634253, canto II, page 354:
      To ſee our Women's Teeth look white. / And ev'ry ſaucy ill-bred Fellow / Sneers at a Mouth profoundly yellow. / In China none hold Women ſweet, / Except their Snags are black as jett.
  6. (figuratively) A problem or difficulty with something.
    we hit a snag
    Synonym: hitch
  7. A pulled thread or yarn, as in cloth.
  8. One of the secondary branches of an antler.
    Synonyms: tine, point
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

snag (third-person singular simple present snags, present participle snagging, simple past and past participle snagged)

  1. To catch or tear (e.g. fabric) upon a rough surface or projection.
    Be careful not to snag your stockings on that concrete bench!
  2. To damage or sink (a vessel) by collision; said of a tree or branch fixed to the bottom of a navigable body of water and partially submerged or rising to just beneath the surface.
    The steamboat was snagged on the Mississippi River in 1862.
  3. (fishing) To fish by means of dragging a large hook or hooks on a line, intending to impale the body (rather than the mouth) of the target.
    We snagged for spoonbill from the eastern shore of the Mississippi River.
  4. (slang, transitive) To obtain or pick up.
    Ella snagged a bottle of water from the fridge before leaving for her jog.
    • 2017, Off Track Planet's Travel Guide for the Young, Sexy, and Broke
      Tickets are cheaper the younger you are—snag a youth ticket (if you're twenty-five or under) for a 35 percent discount. If both you and your travel partner are twenty-six or older, the Small Group Saver will knock off 15 percent.
  5. (UK, dialect) To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly.
    • 1846, Sir Richard Levinge, "Echoes from the Backwoods", in The New Monthly Volume 76
      When felled and snagged, one end of the tree is placed upon a small sledge, and dragged out of the bush by oxen
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

The Australian National Dictionary Centre suggests that snag as slang for "sausage" most likely derives from the earlier British slang for "light meal", although it makes no comment on how it came to be specifically applied to sausages.Meanings and origins of Australian words and idioms The word's use in football slang originates as a shortening of "sausage roll", rhyming slang for "goal", to sausage, and hence, by synonymy, snag.

Noun[edit]

snag (plural snags)

  1. (UK, dialect, obsolete) A light meal.
  2. (Australia, informal, colloquial) A sausage. [From 1937.]
    Synonyms: (UK) banger, (NZ) snarler
    • 2005, Peter Docker, Someone Else′s Country, 2010, ReadHowYouWant, page 116,
      I fire up the barbie and start cooking snags.
    • 2007, Jim Ford, Don't Worry, Be Happy: Beijing to Bombay with a Backpack, page 196,
      ‘You can get the chooks and snags from the fridge if you want,’ he replied.
      I smiled, remembering my bewilderment upon receiving exactly the same command at my very first barbecue back in Sydney a month after I′d first arrived.
    • 2010, Fiona Wallace, Sense and Celebrity, page 25,
      ‘Hungry? We′ve got plenty of roo,’ one of the men said as she walked up. He pointed with his spatula, ‘and pig snags, cow snags, beef and chicken.’
  3. (Australian rules football, slang) A goal.
    • 2003, Greg Baum, "Silver anniversary of a goal achieved", The Age
      "It just kept coming down and I just kept putting them through the middle," he said. "I got an opportunity, and I kicked a few snags."
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

snag (plural snags)

  1. A misnaged, an opponent to Chassidic Judaism (more likely modern, for cultural reasons).

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

snag (plural snags)

  1. (informal, uncommon) Acronym of sensitive new age guy.
    • 1999, Anthony McMahon, Taking Care of Men: Sexual Politics in the Public Mind, Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 103:
      Over time, the ‘sensitive’ aspect of the SNAG has become paramount.
    • 2006 September 22, Jason Deans, “Single white media male. GSOH …”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Mediadates offers handy tips for online dating virgins and a list of popular abbreviations used in website chatrooms. So you can tell a shag from a "Snag" - sensitive new age guy.
    • 2008 [2001], Toby Young, How to Lose Friends and Alienate People, Philadelphia, PA: Da Capo, →ISBN, page 76:
      Naturally, the Frat Boy and the Toadmeister decided to hold a contest to see who could “drop the hammer” with Pippi first. Chris’s strategy was to pretend to be a “snag” (Sensitive New Age Guy) in the hope of appealing to her alternative side.
Alternative forms[edit]
See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kroonen, G. (2011). The Proto-Germanic n-stems: A Study in Diachronic Morphophonology. Netherlands: Editions Rodopi, p. 334

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

snag m (genitive singular snaga, nominative plural snaganna)

  1. a catch (hesitation in voice), gasp, sob
  2. a lull (period of rest)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably related to Scottish Gaelic snag (sharp knock), also "wood-pecker."

Noun[edit]

snag m (genitive singular snaga, nominative plural snaganna)

  1. a treecreeper (bird of the family Certhiidae)
    Synonym: beangán
  2. goby (fish)
    Synonym: mac siobháin
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
snag shnag
after an, tsnag
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "snag" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “snag” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “snag” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to snaidh (hew, chip), from Proto-Celtic *sknad, from Proto-Indo-European *k(ʷ)end- or *k(ʷ)enHd(ʰ)-, see also Sanskrit खादति (khādati, to chew, to bite) and Persian خاییدن(xâyidan, to chew).[1]

Noun[edit]

snag f (genitive singular snaige, plural snagan)

  1. sharp knock (sound)

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
snag shnag
after "an", t-snag
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ MacBain, Alexander; Mackay, Eneas (1911), “snag”, in An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, Stirling, →ISBN, page snag