sang

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See also: Sang, sāng, sǎng, sàng, säng, sång, and sáng

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sang

  1. simple past tense of sing

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal, from Vulgar Latin sanguem, alteration of Latin sanguinem, accusative of sanguis, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁sh₂-én-, oblique stem of *h₁ésh₂r̥ (blood). The word, originally masculine, became feminine in Catalan. Compare French sang, Italian sangue, Occitan sang, Romanian sânge, Spanish sangre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sang f (plural sangs)

  1. blood

Related terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sǫngr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sang c ( singular definite sangen, plural indefinite sange)

  1. song
  2. singing

Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

sang

  1. past tense of synge

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sanc, from Vulgar Latin sanguem, alteration of Latin sanguinem, accusative of sanguis, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁sh₂-én-, oblique stem of *h₁ésh₂r̥ (blood). Compare Catalan sang, Italian sangue, Romanian sânge, Spanish sangre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sang m (plural sangs)

  1. blood

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • sanc (standard orthography)

Noun[edit]

sang m

  1. Alternative form of sanc

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sang

  1. past tense of singen

Malay[edit]

Article[edit]

sang

  1. the (used in proper names)
    Hikayat Sang Kancil
    Tales of the Mousedeer

Synonyms[edit]


Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of sāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of sǎng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of sàng.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sanc, from Vulgar Latin sanguem, alteration of Latin sanguinem, accusative of sanguis.

Noun[edit]

sang m (plural sangs)

  1. blood

Descendants[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sanc, from Vulgar Latin sanguem, alteration of Latin sanguinem, accusative of sanguis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

sang m (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) blood

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse sǫngr

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sang m (definite singular sangen, indefinite plural sanger, definite plural sangene)

  1. a song

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

sang

  1. past tense of synge

See also[edit]

References[edit]

“sang” in The Bokmål Dictionary.


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal, from Vulgar Latin sanguem, alteration of Latin sanguinem, accusative of sanguis.

Noun[edit]

sang m, f (uncountable)

  1. blood

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sangwaz. Cognate with Old High German sanc, Old Norse sǫngr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sang m

  1. song
  2. (Christianity) liturgical service

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin sanguem, alteration of Latin sanguinem, accusative of sanguis.

Noun[edit]

sang m

  1. blood

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sang

  1. expensive, luxurious

Verb[edit]

sang

  1. to go over, to come over, to cross
  2. to transfer
  3. to be noble