yurt

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See also: Yurt and ýurt

English[edit]

A yurt in Central Asia photographed by Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky between 1905 and 1915
A modern yurt in Baliny, Czech Republic

Etymology[edit]

From French yourte or German Jurte, from Russian ю́рта(júrta, yurt), from a Turkic language, related to Turkish yurt(home, homeland).[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

yurt ‎(plural yurts)

  1. A large, round, semi-permanent tent with vertical walls and a conical roof, usually associated with Central Asia and Mongolia (where it is known as a ger).
    • 1880, Henry H[oyle] Howorth, “The Nogais, Karakalpaks, and Siberian Tartars”, in History of the Mongols from the 9th to the 19th Century. Part II. The So-called Tartars of Russia and Central Asia, part II, division II, London: Longmans, Green, and Co., OCLC 34914125, page 1026:
      [T]heir [the Nogais'] cattle grazed on the Little Injik, only seven versts from the boundary line. In summer they kept them in the Black Mountains, and in winter at their auls. They lived in felt yurts, and often changed their place of abode.
    • 1994 February, Andrew Stiny, “Yurts of the San Juans: Ski and Camp in the Colorado/New Mexico High Country, Mongolian Style”, in Backpacker: The Magazine of Wilderness Travel, volume 22, number 129(1), Emmaus, Pa.: Rodale, Inc., ISSN 0277-867X, OCLC 859045083, page 70:
      Who would have imagined that the circular, skin-covered, pole-framed tents used by Mongolian nomads would find another life in the Colorado backcountry? The Mongols might be surprised if they could see how their portable structures have been improved and put to use in the San Juan Mountains of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. [] About halfway to the [Neff Mountain] yurt, the trail makes an uphill switchback and passes the bottom of a big, open bowl.
    • 2000, Brian Litz, “San Juan Mountains”, in Colorado Hut to Hut. Volume 2: Southern Region, volume 2, Englewood, Colo.: Westcliffe Publishers, ISBN 978-1-56579-385-9, page 55:
      Northeast of the center's main group of yurts is a new neighbor—the Spruce Hole Yurt—operated by Cumbres Nordic Adventures. This yurt is easy to get to, affords scenic views, and serves up classic touring terrain.
    • 2008 August, Paul Brummell, “Background Information”, in Kazakhstan: The Bradt Travel Guide, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire: Bradt Travel Guides, ISBN 978-1-84162-234-7, page 17:
      The principal dwelling of the nomadic Kazakhs, the circular, felt-covered yurt is a potent image of Kazakh culture. Few Kazakhs now live in yurts, although they are still used by some pastoralists who still move their herds into summer mountain pastures. [] But the imagery of the yurt remains central to Kazakh ethnic identity, and provides national cultural symbolism deployed by the authorities of independent Kazakhstan.
    • 2010, Lydia Laube, Slow Boat to Mongolia, Kent Town, South Australia: Wakefield Press, ISBN 978-1-86254-900-5:
      I saw the first round white roofs of yurts, or gers as they are called in Mongolian. Yurt is Russian, and all that is Russian is now on the outer in Mongolia. If you said yurt, Mongolians looked at you as though you had uttered a dirty word.
    • 2013, Robert F. Lee, How to Build a (Semi) Solid Wall Yurt, [United States]: Published by CreateSpace for Robert F. Lee, ISBN 978-1-4912-6476-8, page 71:
      When designing any building (including a yurt), one should consider the trade-off between letting in more light and heat in the winter and blocking the intense rays of the sun in the summer. [] The first few months during which we lived in our yurt saw the sun burning into our south and southwest facing windows. Our only solution was to use blinds, which left the yurt darkened. A more viable solution was a mirrored portable awning that was built into a scaffold sitting just outside the window.

Synonyms[edit]

  • ger (in Mongolia)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ yurt” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  2. ^ yurt” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online.

See also[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

yurt f (plural yurts)

  1. Alternative form of iurte

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic yurt, from Proto-Turkic *jūrt(dwelling place, home).

Noun[edit]

yurt ‎(definite accusative yurdu, plural yurtlar)

  1. native country, homeland
  2. home
  3. student dormitory, hostel
  4. yurt (tent)

Derived terms[edit]


Woiwurrung[edit]

Noun[edit]

yurt

  1. jaw

References[edit]

  • Barry J. Blake, Woiwurrung, in The Aboriginal Language of Melbourne and Other Sketches (1991; edited by R. M. W. Dixon and Barry J. Blake; OUP, Handbook of Australian Languages 4), pages 31–124