Reconstruction:Proto-Sino-Tibetan/s-la

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
Asterisk.svg
This Proto-Sino-Tibetan entry contains reconstructed words and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Sino-Tibetan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Camellia sinensis, the species from which tea is nowadays usually extracted.
Sonchus oleraceus, one of the bitter taste plants that referred to.
  • Proto-Sino-Tibetan: ?
    • Proto-Tibeto-Burman: *s-la (Matisoff, STEDT)

Cognate with *lap ‎(leaf), *lep ~ ljap ‎(flat, thin, flat object); see there for more cognates.

This root is the eventual source of the words for "tea" in most non-Sino-Tibetan languages of the world, mostly borrowed from Chinese . Two Chinese sources of borrowing are usually distinguished:

  1. the affricativised varieties (e.g. Beijing Mandarin, Guangzhou Cantonese): which pronounce with an affricate initial /t͡sʰ, ʈ͡ʂʰ/.

       English:  chai
          Korean:   (cha, “cha”)
          Japanese:   ‎(ちゃ, cha)
          Vietnamese:  trà, chè

  2. the plosive varieties (e.g. Min Nan) /t/.

       English:  tea
          Korean:   (da, “da”)
          Japanese:   ‎(, da; ta)

The Chinese word might have originally been a loan from Loloish (Tibeto-Burman) *la ("leaf, tea"), as tea may have originated in Sichuan (Lolo area) (Sagart, 1999). Alternatively, Qiu (2000) suggests that it was a semantic extension from the root *la, the name of a bitter plant (Sonchus oleraceus).

A similar-shaped etymon exists in Proto-Mon-Khmer: *slaʔ ‎(leaf) (Modern Mon သၠ ‎(hlaʔ, leaf), Khmer ស្លា ‎(slaa, areca palm), ស្លឹក ‎(slǝk, leaf, sheet), Vietnamese ‎(leaf)).

More at Tea#The word "tea" on Wikipedia.

Definitions[edit]

  1. leaf
  2. tea
  3. flat object

Descendants[edit]

  • Old Chinese: /*rlaː, laː, ɦlja/ (ZS), /*lˁra, lˁa, l̥a/ (B-S; unlisted, theoretical) ("bitter taste vegetable; weed; white flower; poison, harm; tea")
    • → Japanese: [t͡ɕʲa̠]
    • → Korean: ‎(cha) [t͡ɕʰa]
    • Middle Chinese: /ɖɣa, ʑia, duo/, /ɖɣa/

         Tibetan:   ‎(ja, tea)

    • Min
      • Min Nan
        • Taiwan: /te²⁴/
        • Xiamen (Amoy): ‎()
          • → Dutch: thee (partly via Malay teh)
            • Afrikaans: tee
            • → Asturian: (probably via Spanish)
            • → Catalan: te (probably via Spanish)
            • → Danish: te, the
              • → Faroese: te
            • → English: tea
              • → Abenaki: ti
              • → Chickasaw: tii'
              • → Cocopa: ṭi·
              • → Cornish:
              • Gullah: tea
              • → Irish: tae
              • Jamaican Creole: tea
              • → Maori:
              • → Malecite-Passamaquoddy: ti
              • → Mi'kmaq: ti'g'tlo'q, ji'gitlo'q ‎(kettle) (from English "tea kettle")
              • → Panamint (Shoshone): tii
              • → Welsh: te
            • → Esperanto: teo
            • → French: thé
              • → Cree: ᑎᕀ ‎(tiy) / tiy (or from English)
              • → Greek: τέϊον ‎(téïon) (with neuter suffix -ion)
              • Haitian Creole: te
              • Louisiana Creole French: thé
              • → Norman: thée
              • → Old Armenian: թէյ ‎(tʿēy)
              • → Walloon:
            • → German: Tee
              • → Dutch Low Saxon: tee
              • → German Low German: Tee
                • Plautdietsch: Tee
              • → Lower Sorbian: tej
              • → Saterland Frisian: Tee
              • → Silesian: tyj
              • → Silesian German: Tee
                • → Slovene: tẹ́ (now dialectal)
              • → Vilamovian: tyy
              • → Zipser German: Tee
            • → Icelandic: te
            • → Italian:
            • → Latin: thea
            • → Latvian: tēja
            • → Norwegian: te
            • → Occitan: (probably via French or Spanish)
            • → Romansch: (via French, German or Italian:) te, ,
            • → Spanish:
            • → Swedish: te
              • → Finnish: tee
            • → Unami: ti (possibly via English)
            • → West Frisian: tee
          • → Indonesian: teh
          • → Malay: teh
  • Lolo-Burmese-Naxi