baud

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French baud. Named for French inventor Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

baud ‎(countable and uncountable, plural bauds)

  1. (computing, telecommunications) A rate defined as the number of signalling events per second in a data transmission.
  2. (computing, informal) Synonym for bps (bits per second), regardless of how many signalling events are necessary to signal each bit.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vōx, vocem, possibly influenced by vōtum.

Noun[edit]

baud f

  1. voice

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French bald ‎(joyous, full of ardor), from Frankish *bald, *balt, from Proto-Germanic *balþaz ‎(strong, bold) (compare English bold, Dutch boud).

Noun[edit]

baud m ‎(plural bauds)

  1. A type of hunting dog

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from French baud. Named for French inventor Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903).

Noun[edit]

baud m ‎(plural bauds)

  1. baud

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

baud

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐌿𐌳

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Frankish *bald or similar Germanic source, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *balþaz. More at bold.

Adjective[edit]

baud

  1. bold; brave
  2. cheerful; full of ardour

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

baud m (plural bauds)

  1. (computing, telecommunications) baud (a rate defined as the number of signalling events per second)

Scots[edit]

Adjective[edit]

baud ‎(comparative mair baud, superlative maist baud)

  1. bad