baud

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See also: Baud

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French baud. Named for French inventor Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɔːd/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔːd

Noun[edit]

baud (countable and uncountable, plural bauds)

  1. (computing, telecommunications) A unit of data transmission symbol rate; the number of signalling events per second.
    • 1985 April 13, Stephanie Poggi, “Queer Hackers”, in Gay Community News, page 2:
      To reach the Backroom Bulletin Board, call (718) 849-6699 with a computer, using either the 300 or 1200 baud setting on the modem.
  2. (computing, informal) bps (bits per second), regardless of how many bits are represented by each symbol.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

baud m inan

  1. baud (unit of rate of data transmission)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • baud in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • baud in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vōx, vocem, possibly influenced by vōtum.

Noun[edit]

baud f

  1. voice

Dibabawon Manobo[edit]

Noun[edit]

baud

  1. pigeon

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Old French baud, bald (joyous, full of ardor), from Frankish *bald, *balt, from Proto-Germanic *balþaz (strong, bold) (compare English bold, Dutch boud).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

baud m (plural bauds)

  1. a type of hunting dog
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English baud. Named for French inventor Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

baud m (plural bauds)

  1. baud (unit)

Further reading[edit]

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

baud

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐌿𐌳

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

baud

  1. (non-standard since 2005) past tense of by
  2. (non-standard since 2005) past tense of byde

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

baud

  1. past tense of by

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Frankish *bald or similar Germanic source, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *balþaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

baud m (oblique and nominative feminine singular baude)

  1. bold; brave
  2. cheerful; full of ardour

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Bourguignon: baud
  • Middle French: baud
  • Italian: baldo
  • Middle English: bawde, baude (noun)

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbaw.d͡ʒi/ [ˈbaʊ̯.d͡ʒi], /ˈbawd͡ʒ/ [ˈbaʊ̯d͡ʒ]
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbawd͡ʒ/ [ˈbaʊ̯d͡ʒ], /ˈbaw.d͡ʒi/ [ˈbaʊ̯.d͡ʒi]

  • Hyphenation: baud

Noun[edit]

baud m (plural bauds)

  1. (computing, telecommunications) baud (a rate defined as the number of signalling events per second)

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German bald.

Adverb[edit]

baud

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) early

Scots[edit]

Adjective[edit]

baud (comparative mair baud, superlative maist baud)

  1. bad