bald

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See also: bäld and Bald.

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English balled ‎(bald), from ball ‎(white spot, blaze) ( + -ed), from Old English *bala ‎(white patch, blaze), from Proto-Germanic *balô ‎(flame), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- ‎(light, bright). Cognate with Danish bældet ‎(bald), Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌻𐌰- ‎(bala-, shining, grey (of body)), Old English bǣl ‎(fire, flame; funeral pyre), Albanian balë ‎(white spot on the forehead) and ball ‎(forehead).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

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bald ‎(comparative balder, superlative baldest)

  1. Having no hair, fur or feathers.
    • 1922, Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit
      The Skin Horse had lived longer in the nursery than any of the others. He was so old that his brown coat was bald in patches and showed the seams underneath, and most of the hairs in his tail had been pulled out to string bead necklaces.
    1. Having no hair on the head.
      a bald man with a moustache
  2. Of tyres: whose surface is worn away.
  3. (of a statement or account) Unembellished.
    • 1922, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Black Doctor
      Such is a bald statement of the singular and romantic series of events which centred public attention upon this Lancashire tragedy.
    • 1994, Route 9A Reconstruction Project, Battery Place to 59th St.:
      The NYSDOT, through the DSEIS, makes a bald assertion in the DSEIS, but does not explain in detail, why it feels that the Short Bypass Tunnel provides a more appropriate and respectful setting for the WTC Memorial.
    • 2006, João Ferreira Duarte, ‎Alexandra Assis Rosa, ‎& Teresa Seruya, Translation Studies at the Interface of Disciplines, ISBN 9027216762, page 115:
      Here the existential process (“there is”) functions as a bald assertion of fact, with no hedging or concessions to the observer's subjectivity, while the nominalization (“a significant role-reversal”) activates a pre-existing category from the discourse of Literary Criticism, into which the present "specimen" will be slotted.
  4. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (of a statement) Without evidence or support being provided.
    • 1891, The Australian law times - Volumes 12-13, page 61:
      The plaintiff in this case must satisfy the judge that she has visible means, the mere bald statement that she has visible means is not suflicient.
    • 2001, Canadian patent reporter, page 194:
      The question regarding this issue is whether the applicant raised sufficient doubts regarding adoption and use of the official mark by the respondent as to have the effect that the respondent's bald assertion is not enough to provide evidence that the official mark was adopted and used or whether a negative inference should be drawn from the failure of the respondent to provide further evidence.
    • 2005, Colin Tredoux, Psychology and Law, ISBN 0702166626, page 198:
      The Criminal Procedure Act of 1977 gives police officials the power and discretion to conduct identification procedures 'A bald statement that the accused is the person who committed the crime is not enough ... the greatest care should be taken to test the evidence.
    • 2010, World Trade Organization, Dispute Settlement Reports 2008: Volume 11, ISBN 0521196620, page 3959:
      The EC's bald assertion of compliance in the context of this scientific and factual landscape highlights the fact that it has made no effort to demonstrate how its new import ban satisfies the conditions of a "provisional" ban under Article 5.7 of the SPS Agreement or "rationally relates" to or is "reasonably supported" by a risk assessment for purposes of Article 5.1 of the SPS Agreement.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

bald ‎(plural balds)

  1. (Appalachia) A mountain summit or crest that lacks forest growth despite a warm climate conducive to such, as is found in many places in the Southern Appalachian Mountains.

Verb[edit]

bald ‎(third-person singular simple present balds, present participle balding, simple past and past participle balded)

  1. (intransitive) To become bald.

See also[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German balt, from Old High German bald, pald, from Proto-Germanic *balþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bald

  1. soon, near in time
    Bald ist der Urlaub vorbei.
    The vacation will soon be over.
  2. (regional) almost
    Mit bald 80 Jahren ist mein Vater noch auf Apfelbäume geklettert.
    At almost 80 years, my father still used to climb on apple trees.

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • bald in Duden online

Novial[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German.

Adverb[edit]

bald

  1. soon

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bald

  1. Alternative form of beald

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *balþaz, whence also Old English bald, Old Norse ballr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bald

  1. bold, quick

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *balþaz, whence also Old English bald, Old Norse ballr.

Adjective[edit]

bald (comparative baldoro, superlative baldost)

  1. bold, fearless

Declension[edit]