dredge

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɹɛdʒ/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛdʒ

Etymology 1[edit]

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From Scots dreg-boat, dreg-bot (from Old English *dreċġ); or alternatively from Middle Dutch dregghe (drag-net), probably ultimately from the same root as drag.

Noun[edit]

dredge (plural dredges)

  1. Any instrument used to gather or take by dragging; as:
    1. A dragnet for taking up oysters, etc., from their beds.
    2. A dredging machine.
    3. An iron frame, with a fine net attached, used in collecting animals living at the bottom of the sea.
  2. Very fine mineral matter held in suspension in water[1].
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Verb[edit]

dredge (third-person singular simple present dredges, present participle dredging, simple past and past participle dredged)

  1. To make a channel deeper or wider using a dredge.
  2. To bring something to the surface with a dredge.
  3. (Usually with up) to unearth.
    to dredge up someone's unsavoury past
    • 2017 May 13, Barney Ronay, “Antonio Conte’s brilliance has turned Chelsea’s pop-up team into champions”, in the Guardian[1]:
      Friday night’s crowning victory at The Hawthorns was the 25th in 30 league matches since Antonio Conte’s decisive re-gearing of his team in September, the tactical switches that have coaxed such a thrilling run from this team of bolt-ons and upcycled squad players, most notably Victor Moses, who was dredged out of the laundry bin in the autumn to become a key part of the title surge.
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Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English dragge, from Old French dragee, dragie, from Latin tragēmata, from Ancient Greek τραγήματα (tragḗmata, spices), plural of τράγημα (trágēma, dried fruit).

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Noun[edit]

dredge (countable and uncountable, plural dredges)

  1. (cooking, countable) A large shaker for sprinkling spices or seasonings during food preparation.
  2. (uncountable) A mixture of oats and barley.
    Synonym: bullimong
    • 1991, Edward Miller, ‎Joan Thirsk, The Agrarian History of England and Wales: Volume 3, 1348-1500
      It is true that on the boulder clay of south Cambridgeshire they grew dredge, a mixture of oats and barley

Verb[edit]

dredge (third-person singular simple present dredges, present participle dredging, simple past and past participle dredged)

  1. (cooking, transitive) To sprinkle (food) with spices or seasonings, using a dredge.
    Dredge the meat with the flour mixture you prepared earlier.
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References[edit]

  1. ^ 1881, Rossiter W. Raymond, A Glossary of Mining and Metallurgical Terms