jb

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See also: JB

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

jb (usually uncountable, plural jbs)

  1. Initialism of jailbait.

Anagrams[edit]


Chinese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]


Noun[edit]

jb

  1. Initialism of 雞巴 (jībā).

Egyptian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Afroasiatic *lib (heart), cognate with Proto-Semitic *libb-.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

 

Noun[edit]

ib
Z1

 m

  1. heart
  2. mind
    • c. 1292-1189 B.C.E., (19th Dynasty), Papyrus Chester Beatty V, The Hymn to the Nile flood:[2][3]
      smn
      n
      U32Y1U5
      a
      tSwY1
      Z2
      mibZ1ibZ1ibZ1r
      T
      A1 B1
      Z2
      smn mꜣꜥt m jbw rmṯ […]
      Truth is fixed in the minds of men […]
  3. mental faculties
    • c. 2000 BCE – 1900 BCE, Tale of the Shipwrecked Sailor (pHermitage/pPetersburg 1115) lines 13–17:
      ia
      N35B
      a
      t W
      iim
      m
      amwHrZ1DbaZ2
      k
      ixY2wSbA2kwSdd
      t
      A2k
      mddwA2k
      n
      swt
      n
      G7ib Z1
      k
      ma
      k
      wSbA2kD35
      n
      nititA2
      jꜥ tw jmj mw ḥr ḏbꜥw.k jḫ wšb.k wšd.t(w).k mdw.k n nswt jb.k m-ꜥ.k wšb.k nn njtjt
      Wash yourself, put water on your fingers,
      so you might answer when you are addressed, speak to the king with your mind in your possession, and answer without stammering.
  4. intention, will
  5. emotional state
Inflection[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ib
Z1

 2-lit.

  1. (intransitive) to wish, to intend (+ r: to wish to, to intend to)
  2. (transitive) to think, to suppose
Inflection[edit]
Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

perfective active participle of jbj (to be(come) thirsty)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ibE8A2A1

 m

  1. thirsty man
Inflection[edit]
Alternative forms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Loprieno, Antonio (1995) Ancient Egyptian: A Linguistic Introduction, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 31
  2. ^ Helck, Wolfgang (1972) Der Text des “Nilhymnus”, Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, →ISBN, Page 65
  3. ^ [1]