musette

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French musette, later reborrowed from French musette.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

musette ‎(plural musettes)

  1. (music, now historical) Any of various form of small bagpipe, especially with a bellows, having a soft sound, and once popular in France. [from 14th c.]
  2. A dance tune or pastoral air that imitates this instrument. [from 18th c.]
  3. A small instrument similar to an oboe or shawm. [from 19th c.]
  4. (chiefly US) A small bag or knapsack, with a shoulder strap, used by soldiers, student, tourists, etc., containing food or other things. [from 20th c.]
    • 1929, Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms, Folio Society 2008, page 143:
      I gave them money for platform tickets and had them take my baggage. There was a big rucksack and two musettes.

Synonyms[edit]

(small bagpipe):


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

musette f ‎(plural musettes)

  1. musette
  2. bagpipe

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

musette f

  1. plural of musetta