oso

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Oso, -oso, óso, osó, osò, and 'oso

Arigidi[edit]

Noun[edit]

oso

  1. house, home

References[edit]

  • B. Oshodi, The HTS (High Tone Syllable) in Arigidi: An Introduction, in the Nordic Journal of African Studies 20(4): 263–275 (2011)

Basque[edit]

Adjective[edit]

oso

  1. whole
  2. all
  3. very

Usage notes[edit]

In the meaning 'whole' it is fully adjectival in its behaviour, being placed after the noun and taking normal inflections for the end of the noun phrase. In the meaning 'very' it precedes another adjective and commonly precedes the noun as well:

  • mendi osoathe whole mountain
  • mendi oso handiathe very big mountain
  • oso mendi handiathe very big mountain
  • mendia oso handia dathe mountain is very big

Cebuano[edit]

Noun[edit]

oso

  1. a bear

Chavacano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish oso (bear), from Old Spanish osso, from Vulgar Latin *ussus, from Latin ursus, from Proto-Italic *orssos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ŕ̥tḱos (bear).

Noun[edit]

oso

  1. bear

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese usso, from Vulgar Latin *ussus, from Latin ursus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

oso m (plural osos)

  1. bear (animal)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • usso” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • oso” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • usso” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • oso” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • oso” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin ausus, perfect participle of audeō (I dare, venture, risk).

Adjective[edit]

oso (feminine singular osa, masculine plural osi, feminine plural ose) (archaic or literary)

  1. bold, daring
    Synonyms: ardito, audace
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Paradiso, Le Monnier, published 2002, Canto XIV, lines 130–132, page 258:
      Forse la mia parola par troppo osa, ¶ posponendo il piacer de li occhi belli, ¶ ne’ quai mirando mio disio ha posa
      Perhaps my word appears somewhat too bold, postponing the delight of those fair eyes, into which gazing my desire has rest
    1. Used in the archaic locution essere oso: to dare (literally, “to be daring, bold”)
      • c. 1307, Dante Alighieri, “Trattato quarto, Capitolo VI [Fourth Treatise, Chapter 6]”, in Convivio [The Banquet]‎[1], Florence: Le Monnier, published 1964, section 10:
        E diffiniro così questo onesto: ’quello che, sanza utilitade e sanza frutto, per sè di ragione è da laudare’. E costoro e la loro setta chiamati furono Stoici, e fu di loro quello glorioso Catone di cui non fui di sopra oso di parlare.
        And they defined this integrity as “that which apart from utility or profit is for its own sake praiseworthy according to reason.” They and their sect were called Stoics, and to them belonged that glorious Cato of whom I did not dare to speak above.
      • 1374, Francesco Petrarca, “Trionfo della fama, Capitolo III [Triumph of Fame, Chapter 3]”, in I trionfi [Triumphs], collected in Le rime di M. Francesco Petrarca, Venice: Giuseppe Bortoli, published 1739, page 314:
        Vidi Archimede star col viso basso ¶ E Democrito andar tutto pensoso ¶ Per suo voler di lume e d’oro casso; ¶ Vidi Ippia, il vecchiarel che già fu oso ¶ Dir: - Io so tutto, - e poi di nulla certo
        I saw Archimedes looking down, and Democritus going immersed in thought, by his own will without light or gold; I saw Hippias, the old man that dared to say: "I know everything", and yet sure of nothing
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Substantivization of the chemistry suffix -oso.

Noun[edit]

oso m (plural osi)

  1. (biochemistry) Synonym of osio (monose)

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

oso

  1. first-person singular present indicative of osare

References[edit]

  • oso1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • oso2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

oso

  1. Rōmaji transcription of おそ

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

ōsō

  1. dative masculine singular of ōsus
  2. dative neuter singular of ōsus
  3. ablative masculine singular of ōsus
  4. ablative neuter singular of ōsus

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

oso

  1. (obsolete) past plural of asa

Nzadi[edit]

Noun[edit]

osó (plural esó)

  1. face

Further reading[edit]

  • Crane, Thera; Larry Hyman; Simon Nsielanga Tukumu (2011) A grammar of Nzadi [B.865]: a Bantu language of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, →ISBN

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

oso f

  1. vocative singular of osa

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

oso (Cyrillic spelling осо)

  1. vocative singular of osa

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Spanish osso, from Vulgar Latin *ussus, from Latin ursus (compare Asturian osu, Aragonese onso, Catalan ós, French ours, Italian orso, Portuguese urso (Old Portuguese usso), Romanian urs), from Proto-Italic *orssos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ŕ̥tḱos (bear).

Noun[edit]

oso m (plural osos, feminine osa, feminine plural osas)

  1. bear (in general)
  2. boar, male bear
  3. (slang) bear (large hairy man, especially homosexual)
    Tengo un amigo delgado al que le gustan solo los osos barrigudos y velludos.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

oso

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of osar.

Further reading[edit]


Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English house.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

oso

  1. house

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: osso

Tagalog[edit]

isang oso

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish oso.

Noun[edit]

oso

  1. bear (mammal)

Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ossum, popular variant of os. Compare Italian osso.

Noun[edit]

oso m (plural osi)

  1. bone