aorta

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Aorta

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀορτή (aortḗ, the arteries springing from the heart), from ἀορτέω (aortéō), lengthened form of ἀείρω (aeírō, I lift, raise).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aorta (plural aortas or aortae)

  1. (anatomy) The great artery which carries the blood from the heart to all parts of the body except the lungs; the main trunk of the arterial system.
  2. (figuratively) The liveliest part of something.
    Tracing their battles, I had many occasions to walk along Second Avenue, the aorta of the Lower East Side, exploring places that were once as vibrant and tumultuous as Midtown Manhattan. [1]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀορτή (aortḗ, the arteries springing from the heart), from ἀορτέω (aortéō), lengthened form of ἀείρω (aeírō, I lift, raise).

Noun[edit]

aorta f (plural aortes)

  1. (anatomy) aorta

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀορτή (aortḗ, the arteries springing from the heart), from ἀορτέω (aortéō), lengthened form of ἀείρω (aeírō, I lift, raise).

Noun[edit]

aorta f (plural aortes)

  1. (anatomy) aorta

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀορτή (aortḗ, the arteries springing from the heart), from ἀορτέω (aortéō), lengthened form of ἀείρω (aeírō, I lift, raise).

Noun[edit]

aorta f (plural aortas)

  1. (anatomy) aorta

Related terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀορτή (aortḗ, the arteries springing from the heart), from ἀορτέω (aortéō), lengthened form of ἀείρω (aeírō, I lift, raise).

Noun[edit]

aorta m (genitive aorta, nominative plural aortaí)

  1. (anatomy) aorta

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
aorta n-aorta haorta t-aorta
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀορτή (aortḗ, the arteries springing from the heart), from ἀορτέω (aortéō), lengthened form of ἀείρω (aeírō, I lift, raise).

Noun[edit]

aorta f (plural aorte)

  1. (anatomy) aorta

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀορτή (aortḗ, the arteries springing from the heart), from ἀορτέω (aortéō), lengthened form of ἀείρω (aeírō, I lift, raise).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aorta f

  1. (anatomy) aorta
Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • aorta” in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀορτή (aortḗ, the arteries springing from the heart), from ἀορτέω (aortéō), lengthened form of ἀείρω (aeírō, I lift, raise).

Noun[edit]

aorta f (plural aortas)

  1. (anatomy) aorta (great artery)

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀορτή (aortḗ, the arteries springing from the heart), from ἀορτέω (aortéō), lengthened form of ἀείρω (aeírō, I lift, raise).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ǎoːrta/
  • Hyphenation: a‧or‧ta

Noun[edit]

àōrta f (Cyrillic spelling а̀о̄рта)

  1. (anatomy) aorta

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek ἀορτή (aortḗ, the arteries springing from the heart), from ἀορτέω (aortéō), lengthened form of ἀείρω (aeírō, I lift, raise).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aorta f (plural aortas)

  1. (anatomy) aorta

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

aorta c

  1. (anatomy) aorta

Declension[edit]