-arium

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin -ārium.

Suffix[edit]

-arium

  1. A place associated with a specified thing.
  2. A device associated with a specified function.

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin -ārium.

Suffix[edit]

-arium

  1. -arium



Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Neuter substantive of -ārius.

Suffix[edit]

-ārium n ‎(genitive -āriī); second declension

  1. Used to form nouns denoting a "place where things are kept" from other nouns.
    arma ‎(weapons, tools) → armārium ‎(closet, chest)
    sōl ‎(sun) → sōlārium ‎(sundial, house-top)
Usage notes[edit]
  • -ārium of purpose: All usages of the -ārium suffix are properly neuter substantivisations for adjectives derived in -ārius from existing substantives. In most cases, the relationship between the two nouns is `place where;' this usage has been productive in all periods of Classical and post-Classical Latin. In addition, the same suffix has continued to be used to designate novel items according to their purposes. This class constitute approximately a quarter of commonly used -ārium suffixations. Adjectives in -ārius are generally formed from numerals or nouns.
    sūdor ‎(sweat) → sūdarius ‎(sweaty)[1]sūdārium ‎(handkerchief)
    mīlle ‎(thousand) → milliārius ‎(relating to miles or thousands) → milliārium ‎(milepost)
    album ‎(the colour white) → albārius ‎(relating to whitening walls) → albārium ‎(stucco)
  • -ārium by analogy: three commonly used nouns have been formed by analogy from adjectives or verbs:
    viridārium ‎(hunting preserve, from viridis)
    inventārium ‎(inventory, from inveniō)
    caldārium ‎(hottest room in a Roman bath, from caldus)
  • -ārium for re-substantivation: four commonly used nouns are re-substantivated versions of cognate nouns formed directly from the adjectives in -ārium: pampinārium ‎(vine tendril), alveārium ‎(beehive), cellārium ‎(pantry, cellar), and fustuārium ‎(death by cudgeling). With the exception of cellārium, which was first attested in the fourth century, the remaining words were likely coined prior to the first millennium.
Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative -ārium -āria
genitive -āriī -āriōrum
dative -āriō -āriīs
accusative -ārium -āria
ablative -āriō -āriīs
vocative -ārium -āria
Derived terms[edit]


Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Suffix[edit]

-ārium

  1. genitive feminine plural of -āris
  2. genitive masculine plural of -āris
  3. genitive neuter plural of -āris
  4. nominative neuter plural of -ārius
  5. accusative neuter plural of -ārius
  6. vocative neuter plural of -ārius

References[edit]

  1. ^ Martial XI.xxxix