Ida

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See also: ida and idä

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Short form of obsolete names beginning with Germanic īd "work", used for both sexes in medieval England. It was revived in the 19th century, partly mistaken for a Greek name, for the Mount Ida of classical mythology.

Proper noun[edit]

Ida

  1. A female given name.
    • 1809 Sydney Owenson, Woman, or, Ida of Athens, p.127:
      "Ida!!!"
      "It is not a common, but an ancient name in Greece", said the diako,"and was borne by the wife of Lycastus and the mother of the Cretan Minos."
      Osmyn blushed to have been over-heard, and suffered his heart alone to repeat again the sweet and simple name of "Ida".
    • 1938 Graham Greene, Brighton Rock, Compact Books 1993, ISBN 0749317256, page 16:
      "That's what they called me," she said. "My real name's Ida." The old and vulgarised Grecian name recovered a little dignity.
    • 2002 Joyce Carol Oates, I'l Take You There, Fourth Estate 2003, ISBN 0007146442, page 18:
      "Ida" - the name was magical to me. In whispers, in the dark. Beneath bedcovers. Forehead pressed to a windowpane coated with frost. "Ida". What a strange, beautiful name: I could not say it often enough: it was easy to confuse "Ida" with "I" - - -
Usage notes[edit]
  • Fairly common given name in the 19th century, but rare in the English-speaking world today.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ἴδη (Idē).

Proper noun[edit]

Ida

  1. (Greek mythology) Name of two sacred mountains situated in present-day Turkey and Crete, also called Mount Ida.
Derived terms[edit]
External links[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png Mount Ida on Wikipedia.Wikipedia:Mount Ida

Etymology 3[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Ida

  1. A river in eastern Slovakia.

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia cs

Proper noun[edit]

Ida f

  1. A female given name, cognate to German Ida.

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Ida.

Proper noun[edit]

Ida

  1. A female given name.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Popular in the 19th century and recently back in fashion.
  • H.C. Andersen's Little Ida (see the quotation) was actually named Adelaide Brun.

References[edit]

  • [1] Danskernes Navne, based on CPR data: 22 062 females with the given name Ida have been registered in Denmark between about 1890 (=the population alive in 1967) and January 2005, with the frequency peak in the 2000s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Name of early female saints, shortened from compound given names beginning with Germanic element Ida-, Idu-. The meaning is debated, possibly cognate with the Old Norse (work). Since its revival in the 19th century also used as a diminutive of Adelaide.

Proper noun[edit]

Ida

  1. A female given name.

Italian[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Ida

  1. A female given name, similar to German Ida

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Ida. First recorded in Norway in 1660, but not in general use before the 19th century.

Proper noun[edit]

Ida

  1. A female given name.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Popular in the 19th century and once again today. The most common name of girls born in Norway in the 1990s.

References[edit]

  • Kristoffer Kruken - Ola Stemshaug: Norsk personnamnleksikon, Det Norske Samlaget, Oslo 1995, ISBN 82-521-4483-7
  • [2] Statistisk sentralbyrå, Namnestatistikk: 17 273 females with the given name Ida living in Norway on January 1st 2011, with the frequency peak around 1990. Accessed on 19 May, 2011.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Ida. First recorded as a given name in Sweden in 1351, but not in general use before the 19th century.

Proper noun[edit]

Ida

  1. A female given name.

References[edit]

  • Roland Otterbjörk: Svenska förnamn, Almqvist & Wiksell 1996, ISBN 91-21-10937-0
  • [3] Statistiska centralbyrån and Sture Allén, Staffan Wåhlin, Förnamnsboken, Norstedts 1995, ISBN 9119551622: 48 005 females with the given name Ida living in Sweden on December 31st, 2010, with frequency peaks in the 19th century and in the 2000s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.