bogie

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English[edit]

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a French metro car, showing one of its two goblin-like bogies
A bogie on a Finnish hopper wagon

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From northern English dialect in the 19th century, not the same as bogey

Noun[edit]

bogie (plural bogies)

  1. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, rail transport) One of two sets of wheels under a locomotive or railcar; the structure with axles and wheels under a locomotive, railcar, or semi.
  2. (India, dated in UK) A railway carriage.
    • 1959 April, P. Ransome-Wallis, “The Southern in trouble on the Kent Coast”, in Trains Illustrated, page 220:
      Although we took our eight bogies along to Whitstable at 60 m.p.h., and made a clean start from there, after Herne Bay the engine primed badly on Blacksole Bank and nearly stopped before we got over the top. Then we ran like the wind across the marshes with half-regulator, 30 per cent cut-off, and the engine blowing off.
  3. (music) A toy similar to a violin bow, consisting of a wooden stick with notches along one or more sides or edges to produce a rattly noise when stroked against a hard edge, eg, the lip of container.
  4. Alternative form of bogey: various hostile supernatural creatures, especially (Ulster Scots) a ghost.
  5. (military) Alternative form of bogey: an unknown or hostile aircraft.
  6. (golf) Alternative form of bogey: a score of one over par on a hole.
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Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bogie (plural bogies)

  1. (Britain) Alternative form of bogey (piece of mucus from the nostril)
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

After Humphrey Bogart

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bogie (plural bogies)

  1. Alternative form of bogart: a cigarette.
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