flog

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: flög

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /flɒɡ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒɡ
  • (US) IPA(key): /flɑɡ/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English *floggen (suggested by flogge (hammer, sledge), from Old English *floggian, a stem variant of Proto-Germanic *flukkōną (to beat),[1] itself a secondary zero-grade iterative with unetymological -u-, derived from *flōkaną. The original zero-grade iterative *flakkōną had been misinterpreted as an o-grade. See flack (to beat), also as a dialectal noun "a blow, slap". Cognate with Scots flog (a blow, stripe, flogging, noun), Scots flog (thin strip of wood), Norwegian flak (a piece torn off, strip).

Alternatively, a back-formation from flogger, from Low German flogger (a flail).

Verb[edit]

flog (third-person singular simple present flogs, present participle flogging, simple past and past participle flogged)

  1. (transitive) To whip or scourge as punishment.
  2. (transitive) To use something to extreme; to abuse.
    • 2002 October 30, Chris Wardrop, “VL idles rough when warm...”, in aus.cars, Usenet[1]:
      I did seven laps of Fyshwick with the mechanic today. I was turning lots of heads on the last few, people must of thought I was nuts, flogging the car then stopping, then driving slow then flogging it again.
  3. (transitive, Britain, slang) To sell.
    • 2001 January 26, Paul Edwards, “Optus $5/month 5110, T10 and 2288 only 4 days”, in aus.comms.mobile, Usenet[2]:
      And then there's my part time job at Telstra Bigpond flogging their cable network for just $67.55/month long term cost, a BARGAIN, and the other part time job flogging Foxtel at something like $50/month.
  4. (transitive, Australia, New Zealand) To steal something.
  5. (transitive, Australia, New Zealand) To defeat easily or convincingly.
    • 1999 August 16, Mr Ripper, “Nothing to Crow About”, in rec.sport.football.australian, Usenet[3]:
      The Swannies got on a real roll over rounds 16/17 & 18 of 1987. In consecutive SCG matches, they flogged the Eags 30.21 to 10.11, followed that with a 36.20 to 11.7 demolition of the Dons and finally a 31.12 to 15.17 thrashing of Richmond.
    • 2001 June 9, Cas., “Eng v Aus 1977”, in aus.sport.cricket, Usenet[4]:
      Anyone with cable watch this on ESPN "History of Cricket" last night? Australia got flogged by an innings in the fourth test.
    • 2004 June 5, Greg Vincent }:c{, “POLISER- Roosters v Bulldogs”, in aus.sport.rugby-league, Usenet[5]:
      It'll make the Raiders look good.  Getting flogged by a team that got flogged by a team that got flogged by the Bulldogs.
  6. (transitive, Australia, agriculture) To overexploit (land), as by overgrazing, overstocking, etc.
    • 2007 February 6, “Suppliers the losers in Coles-Woolworths war”, in The Age:
      The environment is paying dearly as producers flog their land. Sustainable agriculture needs a new generation of energised science and technology-trained farmers
  7. (theater) To beat away charcoal dust etc. using a flogger.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

flog (plural flogs)

  1. (Australia, informal, derogatory) A contemptible, often arrogant person; a wanker.
    • 2019 June 15, Dmytryshchak, Goya, “AFL fan outrage at 'behaviourial awareness officers'”, in The Age[6]:
      It follows the ejection of a supporter who allegedly ran towards umpire Mathew Nicholls while calling him a "bald-headed flog" at half-time of the Carlton-Brisbane Lions match last Saturday.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Blend of fake +‎ blog

Noun[edit]

flog (plural flogs)

  1. (Internet slang) A weblog designed to look authentic, but actually developed as part of a commercial marketing strategy to promote some product or service.
    • 2008, Lucas Conley, OBD: Obsessive Branding Disorder
      Though a handful of viral videos and flogs have captured significant interest, the vast majority hardly register with consumers.
    • 2009, Nico Carpentier, Benjamin De Cleen, Participation and Media Production: Critical Reflections on Content Creation (page 33)
      An element more problematic [] in the move of corporate communications and practices online is the sometimes masked nature of such initiatives, for example through blogola and flogs.
    • 2010, Beata Klimkiewicz, Media Freedom and Pluralism
      [] hidden advertising and flogs (the use of “personal blogs” for unfair commercial and political purposes), []

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 144

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

flog

  1. past tense of fliegen

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Doublet (showing a-mutation) of flug (flight; cliff), from Old Norse flog, flug (flight; cliff; an illness of the head), from Proto-Germanic *flugą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flog n (genitive singular flogs, nominative plural flog)

  1. (obsolete, poetic) flight (the act of flying)
  2. seizure (sudden attack [of an illness], convulsion, e.g. an epileptic seizure)
  3. seizure (sudden onset of pain)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse flog.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flog n (definite singular floget, indefinite plural flog, definite plural floga)

  1. a flight (the act of flying)
  2. a steep drop, near vertical cliff

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

flog (nominative plural flogs)

  1. flake

Declension[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flog

  1. Soft mutation of blog.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
blog flog mlog unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.