inane

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French inane, from Latin inānis (empty, vain, useless) which is of unknown origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈneɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Adjective[edit]

inane (comparative more inane, superlative most inane)

  1. Lacking sense or meaning (often to the point of boredom or annoyance)
    (lacking sense): Synonyms: silly, fatuous, vapid
    This supremely gifted kid told me that in the early elementary grades, the songs sung in music class were so inane that he wanted to skip grades already! Eventually he did, so better late than never.
  2. Purposeless; pointless
    • (Can we date this quote by I. Taylor and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Vague and inane instincts.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

inane (plural inanes)

  1. That which is void or empty.
    • (Can we date this quote by Locke and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The undistinguishable inane of infinite space.
    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      [...] whom we watch as we watch the clouds careering in the windy, bottomless inane, or read about like characters in ancient and rather fabulous annals.

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin inānis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /iˈna.ne/, [iˈn̺äːn̺e̞]
  • Hyphenation: i‧nà‧ne

Adjective[edit]

inane (masculine and feminine plural inani) (literary)

  1. (rare) empty, void, hollow
    Synonyms: vacuo (literary), vuoto
    Antonyms: colmo, pieno
  2. useless, vain, inane
    Synonyms: inconcludente, infruttuoso, inutile, irrito (literary), vano
    Antonym: utile

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  • inane in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ināne

  1. nominative neuter singular of inānis
  2. accusative neuter singular of inānis
  3. vocative neuter singular of inānis

References[edit]

  • inane in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • inane in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) rich in ideas: sententiis abundans or creber (opp. sententiis inanis)
    • (ambiguous) mere words; empty sound: inanis verborum sonitus
    • (ambiguous) senseless rant: inanium verborum flumen
    • (ambiguous) to be misled by a vain hope: inani, falsa spe duci, induci

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin inānis.

Adjective[edit]

inane m or f (plural inanes, comparable)

  1. inane (lacking sense or meaning)
    Synonyms: vão, vazio, fútil

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin inānis.

Adjective[edit]

inane (plural inanes)

  1. inane; pointless