paramour

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English paramour, paramoure, peramour, paramur, from Old French par amor (for love's sake). The modern pronunciation is apparently an Early Modern English readaptation of the French.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

paramour (plural paramours)

  1. (somewhat archaic) An illicit lover, either male or female.
    Synonyms: leman, mistress; see also Thesaurus:mistress
    to run away with a paramour
    • 1848, Thomas Maucalay, The History of England from the Accession of James the Second:
      The seducer appeared with dauntless front, accompanied by his paramour.
    • 1934, Yusuf Ali (translator), The Holy Qur'an: Text, Translation and Commentary, surah 4, verse 25:
      They should be chaste, not lustful, nor taking paramours:
    • 2016 February 23, Robbie Collin, “Grimsby review: ' Sacha Baron Cohen's vital, venomous action movie'”, in The Daily Telegraph (London):
      The action scenes are deafening and punchily staged by director Louis Letterier (The Transporter), though I wish he’d set more time aside to spend with Nobby, his paramour Dawn (Rebel Wilson), their shaven-headed brood, and friends
  2. (obsolete) The Virgin Mary or Jesus Christ (when addressed by a person of the opposite sex).

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

paramour (third-person singular simple present paramours, present participle paramouring, simple past and past participle paramoured)

  1. To go with a paramour; to have an affair.
    • 1842, John de Jean Fraser, The Stranger in His Native Place:
      The paramouring matron left / A babe and husband both bereft;
    • 2011, Joanna L. Grossman, Lawrence M. Friedman, Inside the Castle, Princeton University Press, →ISBN:
      This meant it could even call in "third party 'paramours'" and tell them to quit their paramouring.

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

paramour (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete, of loving, etc.) Passionately, out of sexual desire.
    Synonyms: devotedly, passionately

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French par amour (for love's sake); equivalent to par- +‎ amour.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌparaˈmuːr/, /ˈparamur/, /ˈparəmur/

Adverb[edit]

paramour

  1. In a loving or sexual way; amorously, passionately.
    Synonym: amorously
  2. In a kind or caring way; affectionately.
  3. Please (used to make a request)

Descendants[edit]

  • English: paramour (obsolete)

References[edit]

Noun[edit]

paramour (plural paramours)

  1. A lover; a sexual or romantic partner:
    1. A paramour; an illicit sexual or romantic partner.
    2. A term of address for someone that one loves.
  2. Sexual, romantic or (less often) spiritual passion.
  3. (rare, figuratively) Used of Jesus or Mary

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]