rebel

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See also: Rebel

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English rebel, rebell, from Old French rebelle, from Latin rebellis (waging war again; insurgent), from rebellō (I wage war again, fight back), from re- (again, back) + bellō (I wage war).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: rĕbʹəl, IPA(key): /ˈɹɛbəl/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

rebel (plural rebels)

  1. A person who resists an established authority, often violently.
    A group of rebels defied the general's orders and split off from the main army.
    My little sister is such a rebel - coming home late, piercing her ears, and refusing to do any of her chores.
  2. (US, historical) Synonym of Confederate: a citizen of the Confederate States of America, especially a Confederate soldier.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English rebellen, from Old French rebeller, from Latin rebellō (I wage war again, fight back), from re- (again, back) + bellō (I wage war). Doublet of revel.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rebel (third-person singular simple present rebels, present participle rebelling, simple past and past participle rebelled)

  1. (intransitive) To resist or become defiant toward an authority.
    to rebel against the system
    • 2014 April 17, Dan Shive, El Goonish Shive (webcomic), Comic for Thursday, Apr 17, 2014:
      "Tedd's feeling a bit rebellious." "I'm not rebelling! I'm self actualizing! By rebelling."
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rebellis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rebel (masculine and feminine plural rebels)

  1. rebellious
  2. persistent, stubborn

Noun[edit]

rebel m or f (plural rebels)

  1. rebel

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology[edit]

From German Rebell.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rebel m anim (feminine rebelka)

  1. rebel
    Je to věčný rebel.He is an eternal rebel.

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French rebelle, from Latin rebellis (waging war again; insurgent), from rebellō (I wage war again, fight back), from re- (again, back) + bellō (I wage war).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: re‧bel

Noun[edit]

rebel m (plural rebellen, diminutive rebelletje n)

  1. rebel

Synonyms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Old French rebelle, from Latin rebellis.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɛbɛl/, /ˈrɛbəl/, /ˈrɛːbəl/

Noun[edit]

rebel (plural rebels or rebelx) (chiefly Late Middle English)

  1. A sinner (as one who rebels against a deity)
  2. A rebel (combatant against the extant government)
  3. One who refuses to follow directives or regulations; a rulebreaker.
  4. (rare) An uprising or revolt against one's authorities.
  5. (rare) One's opponent; an enemy individual.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: rebel
  • Scots: rebel
References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rebel

  1. Treasonous, rebelling; leading an insurrection.
  2. Sinful, iniquitous; defying the commands of a divine authority.
  3. Disobedient, undutiful; refusing to follow directives or laws, or rules.
  4. (rare) Refractory, set in one's ways or opinions.
  5. (rare) Impatient, overly hurried or quick.
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

rebel

  1. Alternative form of rebellen

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French rebelle, from Latin Rebelle.

Adjective[edit]

rebel m or n (feminine singular rebelă, masculine plural rebeli, feminine and neuter plural rebele)

  1. rebel, insurgent

Declension[edit]