vamp

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English vaumpe, vaum-pei, vampe (covering for the foot, perhaps a slipper or understocking; upper of a boot or shoe), or from Anglo-Norman vampe, *vaumpé (part of a stocking covering the top of the foot), from Old French avantpied, avantpiet, variants of avantpié,[1] from avant (in front) + pié (foot).[2]

Noun senses 2 and 3 (“a patch; something patched up or improvised”) appear to have been extended from sense 1 (“top part of a boot or shoe”). Sense 4 (“repeated and often improvised musical accompaniment”}} was probably derived from sense 3, and sense 5 (“activity to fill or stall for time”) from sense 4.

The verb senses were derived from the noun.[3] Compare also Middle English vaum-peien ((uncertain) to repair (footwear) with a new upper or vamp; to fabricate an upper or vamp).[4]

Noun[edit]

vamp (plural vamps)

  1. The top part of a boot or shoe, above the sole and welt and in front of the ankle seam, that covers the instep and toes; the front part of an upper; the analogous part of a stocking. [from c. 1225]
  2. Something added to give an old thing a new appearance; a patch.
  3. Something patched up, pieced together, improvised, or refurbished.
  4. (music) A repeated and often improvised accompaniment, usually consisting of one or two measures, often a single chord or simple chord progression, repeated as necessary, for example, to accommodate dialogue or to anticipate the entrance of a soloist. [from c. 1789]
    • 2005, Steve Swayne, “Pulling It Apart”, in How Sondheim Found His Sound, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, →ISBN, page 116:
      I would go even further and say that, once [Stephen] Sondheim had ceased to compose classical music with its nonspecific accompaniments, he began to explore how effectively a vamp can flesh out a character for the stage. He had little need to write distinctive vamps for his Williams [College] shows, but already in 1954—before the highly characteristic vamps in West Side Story—we see him growing in his ability to get under a character's skin through his accompaniment.
  5. (by extension) An activity or speech intended to fill or stall for time.

Verb[edit]

vamp (third-person singular simple present vamps, present participle vamping, simple past and past participle vamped)

  1. (transitive) To patch, repair, or refurbish.
  2. (transitive) Often as vamp up: to fabricate or put together (something) from existing material, or by adding new material to something existing.
    • 1838 March – 1839 October, Charles Dickens, “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Vincent Crummles, and Positively His Last Appearance on the Stage”, in The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, London: Chapman and Hall, [], published 1839, OCLC 1057107260, page 478:
      For instance, you take the uncompleted books of living authors, fresh from their hands, wet from the press, cut, hack, and carve them to the powers and capacities of your actors, and the capability of your theatres, finish unfinished works, hastily and crudely vamp up ideas not yet worked out by their original projector, but which have doubtless cost him many thoughtful days and sleepless nights; []
    • 1911 May 20, G[ilbert] K[eith] Chesteron, “The Flying Stars”, in The Innocence of Father Brown, London; New York, N.Y.: Cassell and Company, published 1911, OCLC 2716904, page 112:
      With real though rude art, the harlequin danced slowly backwards out of the door into the garden, which was full of moonlight and stillness. The vamped dress of silver paper and paste, which had been too glaring in the footlights, looked more and more magical and silvery as it danced away under a brilliant moon.
  3. (transitive) To cobble together, to extemporize, to improvise.
    • 1844, [Charles MacFarlane], “Lord Hereward Goes to Get His Own”, in The Camp of Refuge. In Two Volumes, volume I, London: Charles Knight & Co., Ludgate Street, OCLC 558168449, page 120:
      [S]ome men, nay, even some monks and brothers of this very house, are so envious of my state and foes to my peace of mind, that whenever they see me more happy and fuller of hope than common, they vamp me up some story or conjure some spectrum to disquiet me and sadden me!
    1. (transitive, intransitive, music, specifically) To perform a vamp (a repeated, often improvised accompaniment, for example, under dialogue or while waiting for a soloist to be ready).
      • 1880, [George] Bernard Shaw, chapter I, in The Irrational Knot [...] Being the Second Novel of His Nonage, London: Archibald Constable & Co., published 1905, OCLC 1050472693, page 14:
        "It is so unkind to joke about it," said the beautiful young lady. "What shall I do? If somebody will vamp an accompaniment, I can get on very well without any music. But if I try to play for myself I shall break down."
      • 1954, Alexander Alderson, chapter 4, in The Subtle Minotaur, London: John Gifford [], OCLC 7313814, OL 12152304W, page 52:
        The band played ceaselessly. Even when the other instruments were resting the pianist kept up his monotonous vamping, with a dreary furbelow for embellishment here and there, to which some few of the dancers continued to shuffle round the floor.
  4. (transitive, shoemaking) To attach a vamp (to footwear).
  5. (transitive, intransitive, now dialectal) To travel by foot; to walk.
  6. (intransitive) To delay or stall for time, as for an audience.
    Keep vamping! Something’s wrong with the mic!
    She went out there to vamp since the speaker was late arriving.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of vampire.[5] From a character type developed first for silent film, notably for Theda Bara's role in the 1915 film A Fool There Was.

The verb is derived from the noun.[6]

Noun[edit]

vamp (plural vamps)

  1. A flirtatious, seductive woman, especially one who exploits men by using their sexual desire for her. [from c. 1915]
    • 1919 June, Renee Van Dyke, Geo[rge] M. Downs, Jr., editor, Interesting Paragraphs about the Players, volume 2, number 8, Philadelphia, Pa.: The Downs Publishing Company, OCLC 8018241, page 59, column 3:
      It is the vamp who has a sense of humor that can really hold a man. She laughs at him, even as she is seeking to allure him—and he adores it.
    • 1922, F[rancis] Scott Fitzgerald, “The Connoisseur of Kisses”, in The Beautiful and Damned, New York, N.Y.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, book 1, page 95:
      She was got up to the best of her ability as a siren, more popularly a "vamp"—a picker up and thrower away of men, an unscrupulous and fundamentally unmoved toyer with affections.
    • 1927 September, G[ilbert] K[eith] Chesteron, “The Actor and the Alibi”, in The Secret of Father Brown, London; Toronto, Ont.: Cassell and Company, OCLC 968450825, page 148:
      "Lady Miriam?" said Jarvis in surprise. "Oh, yes. … I suppose you mean that she looks a queer sort of vamp. But you've no notion what even the ladies of the best families are looking like nowadays. []"
    • 1936, G[ilbert] K[eith] Chesterton, “The Vampire of the Village”, in The Penguin Complete Father Brown, Harmondsworth, Middlesex, London: Penguin Books, published 1985, OCLC 53434239, page 707:
      Well, her seclusion is considered suspicious. She annoys them by being good-looking and even what is called good style. And all the young men are warned against her as a vamp.
  2. (informal) A vampire.
    • 1992, Robert Marrero, Dracula: The Vampire Legend on Film, 1st American edition, Key West, Fla.: Fantasma Books, →ISBN, page 20, column 2:
      The leader of the vampire cult (played by Ramon D'Salva) leads his cult of fellow vamps in an attack against some nasty werewolves.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

vamp (third-person singular simple present vamps, present participle vamping, simple past and past participle vamped)

  1. (transitive) To seduce or exploit someone.
    • 1936, G[ilbert] K[eith] Chesterton, “The Vampire of the Village”, in The Penguin Complete Father Brown, Harmondsworth, Middlesex, London: Penguin Books, published 1985, OCLC 53434239, page 707:
      "People who lose all their charity generally lose all their logic," remarked Father Brown. "It's rather ridiculous to complain that she keeps to herself; and then accuse her of vamping the whole male population."
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Origin uncertain;[7] possibly related to vamp (etymology 1, above): see the 2008 quotation.

Noun[edit]

vamp (plural vamps)

  1. (US, slang) A volunteer firefighter.
    • 1892, “Companies of the Seventh District”, in Our Firemen: The Official History of the Brooklyn Fire Department, from the First Volunteer to the Latest Appointee. Compiled from the Records of the Department, Brooklyn, New York, N.Y.: [Brooklyn Fire Department], OCLC 6052102, page 371:
      John Mackin is one of the old-timers of the new Department. He was a volunteer fireman as well, [] John Mackin was among the number of "old vamps" who made application to the first Board of Fire Commissioners for appointment in the Paid Department.
    • 2000, “History of the Atlanta Fire Department”, in History of Service: Atlanta Fire Department Commemorative Yearbook, Paducah, Ky.: Turner Publishing Company, →ISBN, page 25, column 1:
      The vamps had to carry their equipment to the fire on foot!
    • 2008, John Delin, “The Vamps, Syosset’s Bravest”, in Syosset People and Places (Images of America), Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia Publishing, →ISBN, page 88:
      Volunteer firemen are called vamps because they often went to fires on foot, vamp being an old English word for "walk." Syosset's first vamps responded quickly to fires and formed bucket brigades to extinguish them.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ vaumpe, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 17 October 2018; “vaum-pei, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 17 October 2018.
  2. ^ vamp, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1916.
  3. ^ vamp, v.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1916.
  4. ^ vaum-peien, v.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 17 October 2018.
  5. ^ vamp, n.4”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1933.
  6. ^ vamp, v.3”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1933.
  7. ^ vamp, n.3”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1916.

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English vamp.

Noun[edit]

vamp f (invariable)

  1. vamp (flirtatious woman)

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

vamp m, f (plural vamps)

  1. vamp