venter

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See also: Venter

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Latin venter (the belly; the womb; a swelling).

Noun[edit]

venter (plural venters)

  1. A woman with offspring.
  2. (biology) A protuberant, usually hollow structure, notably:
    1. (zootomy) The undersurface of the abdomen of an arthropod.
    2. (botany) The swollen basal portion of an archegonium in which an egg develops.
  3. A broad, shallow concavity, notably of a bone.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From vent +‎ -er.

Noun[edit]

venter (plural venters)

  1. One who vents, who is vocal about feelings or problems.
    • 2006, David Laton, Developing Positive Workplace Skills and Attitudes, →ISBN, page 72:
      Venters suffer interpersonally as others avoid their outburst, they become isolated and alone which may result in more venting.

Etymology 3[edit]

Cognate with Dutch venter (vendor, peddler).

Noun[edit]

venter (plural venters)

  1. (obsolete) A vendor.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

venter

  1. present of vente

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From venten +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

venter m (plural venters, diminutive ventertje n)

  1. A vendor, peddler, door-to-door salesman

Derived terms[edit]

vendor types, mainly by product

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From vent (wind) +‎ -er, from Latin ventus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

venter (impersonal)

  1. (impersonal, weather) To be windy, to blow

Conjugation[edit]

This verb is impersonal and is conjugated only in the third-person singular.

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *wend-tri-, see also German Wanst (belly, paunch), Old High German wanast, Sanskrit वस्ति (vasti, bladder), Latin vēsīca (bladder)[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

venter m (genitive ventris); third declension

  1. (literally)
    1. the belly
      Synonyms: alvus, abdōmen
    2. a paunch, maw, conveying the accessory idea of greediness or gormandizing
    3. (anatomy) the stomach
    4. the body, trunk
  2. (transferred sense)
    1. the womb
      1. an unborn offspring, especially a son
    2. the bowels, entrails
    3. a swelling, protuberance
  3. (figuratively)
    1. sensual lust
    2. gluttony
Quote-alpha.png This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

Inflection[edit]

  • Venter has a shaky history, and some sources list it as a consonant stem, but more commonly (e.g. Allen & Greenough) it is listed as an i-stem.

Third-declension noun (i-stem or parisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative venter ventrēs
Genitive ventris ventrium
ventrum
Dative ventrī ventribus
Accusative ventrem ventrēs
ventrīs
Ablative ventre ventribus
Vocative venter ventrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “ventre” in: Alberto Nocentini, Alessandro Parenti, “l'Etimologico — Vocabolario della lingua italiana”, Le Monnier, 2010, →ISBN
  2. ^ Wagner, Max Leopold (1960–1964), “bèntre”, in Dizionario etimologico sardo, Heidelberg

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Akin to Italian ventre, from Latin venter.

Noun[edit]

venter

  1. belly

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

venter

  1. present of vente