chat

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See also: Chat, chất, chặt, and chật

English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Abbreviation of chatter. The bird sense refers to the sound of its call.

Verb[edit]

chat (third-person singular simple present chats, present participle chatting, simple past and past participle chatted)

Two people chatting. (1) (2)
  1. To be engaged in informal conversation.
    She chatted with her friend in the cafe.
    I like to chat over a coffee with a friend.
  2. To talk more than a few words.
    I met my old friend in the street, so we chatted for a while.
  3. (transitive) To talk of; to discuss.
    They chatted politics for a while.
  4. To exchange text or voice messages in real time through a computer network, as if having a face-to-face conversation.
    Do you want to chat online later?
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

chat (countable and uncountable, plural chats)

  1. (uncountable) Informal conversation.
  2. A conversation to stop an argument or settle situations.
  3. An exchange of text or voice messages in real time through a computer network, resembling a face-to-face conversation.
  4. Any of various small Old World passerine birds in the subfamily Saxicolini that feed on insects.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare chit "small piece of paper", and chad.[1]

Noun[edit]

chat

  1. A small potato, such as is given to swine.

References[edit]

  1. ^ William Safire, The Right Word in the Right Place at the Right Time, p. 43, Simon and Schuster, 2007 ISBN 1416587403.

Etymology 3[edit]

Origin unknown.

Noun[edit]

chat (plural chats)

  1. (mining, local use) Mining waste from lead and zinc mines.
    • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage 2007, p. 441:
      Frank had been looking at calcite crystals for a while now [...] among the chats or zinc tailings of the Lake County mines, down here in the silver lodes of the Vita Madre and so forth.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From thieves' cant.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

chat (plural chats)

  1. (UK, Australia, New Zealand, WWI military slang) A louse (small, parasitic insect).
    • 1977, Mary Emily Pearce, Apple Tree Lean Down, page 520:
      'Do officers have chats, then, the same as us?'
      'Not the same, no. The chats they got is bigger and better, with pips on their shoulders and Sam Browne belts.'
    • 2007, How Can I Sleep when the Seagull Calls? (ISBN 978-1-4357-1811-1), page 18:
      May a thousand chats from Belgium crawl under their fingers as they write.
    • 2013, Graham Seal, The Soldiers' Press: Trench Journals in the First World War (ISBN 1137303263), page 149:
      Trench foot was a nasty and potentially fatal foot disease commonly caused by these conditions, in which chats or body lice were the bane of all.

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

chat (plural chats)

  1. Alternative form of chaat.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English.

Noun[edit]

chat m (plural chats, diminutive chatje n)

  1. chat (online conversation)
  2. chat (online conversation platform)

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

chat

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of chatten
  2. imperative of chatten

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Late Late Latin cattus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chat m (plural chats)

  1. cat (feline)
    • 1910, Henry-D. Davray & B. Kozakiewicz (tr.), La Guerre dans les airs, translation of The War in the Air by H. G. Wells, page 335:
      Soudain, d’un seul élan, cela se précipita sur lui, avec un miaulement plaintif et la queue droite. C’était un jeune chat, menu et décharné, qui frottait sa tête contre les jambes de Bert, en ronronnant.
  2. (male) cat, tom, tomcat
  3. tag, tig (children’s game)
Related terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

English chat

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chat m (plural chats)

  1. (Internet) chat (online discussion)
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Iban[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Min Nan (chhat), from Middle Chinese (tsit).

Noun[edit]

chat

  1. paint (substance)

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chat m

  1. Lenited form of cat.

Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chat f (invariable)

  1. chat (informal conversation via computer)
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Somali.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chat m (invariable)

  1. chat (leaf chewed by people in North Africa and the Middle East)
Synonyms[edit]

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Latin cattus

Noun[edit]

chat m (plural chats or chatz, feminine singular chatte, feminine plural chattes)

  1. cat (animal)

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Latin cattus

Noun[edit]

chat m (oblique plural chaz or chatz, nominative singular chaz or chatz, nominative plural chat)

  1. cat (animal)

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

chat m (plural chats)

  1. chat (exchange of text or voice messages in real time)

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English chat.

Noun[edit]

chat m (plural chats)

  1. chat (exchange of text or voice messages in real time through a computer network)