Reich

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See also: reich and -reich

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Reich (empire, realm).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Reich

  1. A German empire, kingdom or nation; its territory or government.
    • 1762, A. F. Busching, A New System of Geography, volume 4, containing, Part of Germany, viz. Bohemia, Moravia, Lusatia, Austria, Burgundy, Westphalia, and the Circle of the Rhine, translated from German, page 4:
      The Empire is differently denominated as well by Germans themselves as by others. It is called the Reich, in Latin Regnum, by way of eminence, also the German Reich, in Latin Regnum Germanicum. The appellation of Germany, is seldom used now-a-days any where but in the title of the Emperor and Elector of Mentz.
  2. (in particular) The Third Reich; the German state, territory, or government under the Nazis.
    • 2016, Colin Philpott, Relics of the Reich: The Buildings The Nazis Left Behind
    • 2017, Gerhard Engel, At the Heart of the Reich: The Secret Diary of Hitler's Army Adjutant
    • 2019, Peter Finn, A Guest of the Reich: The Story of American Heiress Gertrude Legendre
  3. Any empire, especially one that is imperialist, tyrannical, and/or racist.
    • 1936, The American Mercury (volumes 38-39), page 367:
      And so his fine words — they are excellent within these limitations — must be husbanded exclusively against foes of the Russian Reich. Nevertheless, he too turns his back on the past with a will. . . . God knows how far the Tolstoian talent []
    • 1943, Owen Joseph Christoffer Norem, Timeless Lithuania, page 280:
      Mr. Ycas, one of their members, told me that a serious attempt was made to strike for total independence but that the majority felt it was the wise course to ask for autonomy within the Russian Reich. A Lithuanian National Council was formed.
    • 1943, Francis A. Ridley, Towards the British Revolution, page 15
      Did not Oliver Cromwell, the founder of the British Reich, boast that hanging Irishmen always gave him an excellent appetite? Yet who could deny that he was a political and military genius? One should always compare Imperialisms []
    • 2000, Keith Grint, The Arts of Leadership, page 161:
      Frere, obviously keen to start the thousand-year civilizing mission of the British Reich as soon as possible, invited Cetshwayo to a meeting in December 1878.
    • 2015, Grégoire Chamayou, A Theory of the Drone, page 226:
      [] we are presenting our analysis of the place and significance of the remote war technology within the American Reich.
    • 2017, Madhavan K. Palat, India and the World in the First Half of the Twentieth Century:
      NATO and the European Union, both led by America, embody that purpose. It preserves the sovereignty of the member states, but ultimate sovereignty rests with the American Reich and all the states willingly coordinate their policies with and subordinate themselves to American leadership.

Usage notes[edit]

  • While Germany could only be referred to as the German Empire from 1871 to 1918, when it was under the rule of an emperor (Kaiser), the term “German Reich” describes Germany until 1945.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Reich

  1. A surname​.

Statistics[edit]

  • According to the 2010 United States Census, Reich is the 2,796th most common surname in the United States, belonging to 12,891 individuals. Reich is most common among White (93.85%) individuals.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German riche, from Old High German rīhhi (power, might, empire), from Proto-West Germanic *rīkī, from Proto-Germanic *rīkiją, itself either a substantivised *rīkijaz (rich, mighty) (whence also German reich (rich)), or a direct borrowing from a Celtic language; compare Middle Irish ríge (kingdom).[1]

Cognates include Old English rīċe (kingdom, empire) (obsolete English riche and rike), Dutch rijk (empire, realm), West Frisian ryk, Danish rige (empire, realm), Swedish rike, Icelandic ríki, Lithuanian rikis (military commander, ruler), and Sanskrit राज्य (rājyá, royalty, kingship, sovereignty, empire).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʁaɪ̯ç/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ̯ç
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Reich n (genitive Reiches or Reichs, plural Reiche)

  1. empire or significant State
    • 1868, Wilhelm Hoffmann, Deutschland einst und jetzt im Lichte des Reiches Gottes
  2. realm (also e.g. of plants)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Reich n

  1. the First Reich, the Holy Roman Empire
    • 2006, Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger, Das Heilige Römische Reich Deutscher Nation, page 81:
      Der Prager Frieden hätte den Krieg im Reich beenden können, []
  2. the Deutsche Reich
    1. the (Deutsche) Kaiserreich, the Second Reich (1871 to 1918)
    2. the Weimar Republic (1919 to 1933)
    3. the Third Reich (1933 to 1945)
      • 1969, Gerhard Eisenblätter, Grundlinien der Politik des Reiches gegenüber dem Generalgouvernement, 1939-1945

Descendants[edit]

  • English: Reich
  • Russian: рейх (rejx)

Proper noun[edit]

Reich

  1. A surname​.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (2003) A Handbook of Germanic etymology, Leiden & Boston: Brill, page 305

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Reich (realm).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Reich m (plural Reichs)

  1. Reich (territory of a German empire or nation)

Derived terms[edit]