adi

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Balinese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Chamic *adi, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan *wadi, from Proto-Sunda-Sulawesi *waji, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *huaji, from Proto-Austronesian *Suaji.

Noun[edit]

adi

  1. sibling ((younger) person who shares same parents)
    Adine magae di Denpasar.
    His/her younger sibling works in Denpasar.
  2. A younger person to whom one has a close relation.

Iban[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayic *adi, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic *adi, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan *wadi, from Proto-Sunda-Sulawesi *waji, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *huaji, from Proto-Austronesian *Suaji.

Noun[edit]

adi

  1. sibling ((younger) person who shares same parents)

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

adī

  1. second-person singular active imperative of adeō

Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

adi

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of adīt
  2. 2nd person singular imperative form of adīt

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayic *adi, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic *adi, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan *wadi, from Proto-Sunda-Sulawesi *waji, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *huaji, from Proto-Austronesian *Suaji.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

adi (Jawi spelling ادي, plural adi-adi)

  1. Alternative form of adik

Novial[edit]

Verb[edit]

adi (past adid, active participle adint, passive participle adit)

  1. to add

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

adi

  1. second-person plural present indicative of is
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 21c17
      Hóre adi ellachti i corp Crist, rob·bia-si ind indocbál do·ratad do suidiu.
      Since ye are united into Christ's body, ye shall have the glory which has been given to him.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Thurneysen (Grammar of Old Irish, translators Binchy and Bergin, page 484) considers this form, which occurs only in the passage quoted above, to be a scribal error for adib, but since the -b in that form is taken over from the 2nd person plural pronoun and is not an original verb ending, it is also quite possible that this is a genuine archaic form.