chink

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See also: Chink

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /tʃɪŋk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Etymology 1[edit]

Of uncertain origin; but apparently an extension (with formative -k) of Middle English chine, from Old English ċine (a crack, chine, chink), equivalent to chine +‎ -k.

Alternatively, the -k may represent an earlier unrecorded diminutive, perhaps from Middle English *chinek, making it equivalent to chine +‎ -ock (diminutive ending).

Noun[edit]

chink (plural chinks)

  1. A narrow opening such as a fissure or crack.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Yet I did not give way, but settled to wait for the dawn, which must, I knew, be now at hand; for then I thought enough light would come through the chinks of the tomb above to show me how to set to work.
    • 1842 Thomas Babington Macaulay, Lays of Ancient Rome
      Through one cloudless chink, in a black, stormy sky, / Shines out the dewy morning star.
  2. A chip or dent in something metallic.
  3. (figuratively) A vulnerability or flaw in a protection system or in any otherwise formidable system.
    The warrior saw a chink in her enemy's armor, and aimed her spear accordingly.
    The chink in the theory is that the invaders have superior muskets.
    • 2011 January 30, Kevin Darling, “Arsenal 2 - 1 Huddersfield”, in BBC[1]:
      The first chink in Arsenal's relaxed afternoon occurred when key midfielder Samir Nasri pulled up with a hamstring injury and was replaced.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

chink (third-person singular simple present chinks, present participle chinking, simple past and past participle chinked)

  1. (transitive) To fill an opening such as the space between logs in a log house with chinking; to caulk.
    to chink a wall
  2. (intransitive) To crack; to open.
  3. (transitive) To cause to open in cracks or fissures.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Noun[edit]

chink (plural chinks)

  1. A slight sound as of metal objects touching each other; a clink.
  2. (colloquial, now rare) Ready money, especially in the form of coins.
    • 1834, David Crockett, A Narrative of the Life of, Nebraska 1987, pp. 47-8:
      I thought that if all the hills about there were pure chink, and all belonged to me, I would give them if I could just talk to her when I wanted to []
    • (Can we date this quote by Somerville and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      to leave his chink to better hands
    • 1855, Henry Augustus Wise, Tales for the Marines (page 121)
      At the same time, mind, I must have a bit of a frolic occasionally, for that's all the pleasure I has, when I gets a little chink in my becket; and ye know, too, that I don t care much for that stuff, for a dollar goes with me as fur as a gold ounce does with you, when ye put on your grand airs, and shower it about like a nabob.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

chink (third-person singular simple present chinks, present participle chinking, simple past and past participle chinked)

  1. (intransitive) To make a slight sound like that of metal objects touching.
    The coins were chinking in his pocket.
  2. (transitive) To cause to make a sharp metallic sound, as coins, small pieces of metal, etc., by bringing them into collision with each other.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Alexander Pope to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

chink (plural chinks)

  1. Alternative form of kink (gasp for breath)

Verb[edit]

chink (third-person singular simple present chinks, present participle chinking, simple past and past participle chinked)

  1. Alternative form of kink (gasp for breath)

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

chink (plural chinks)

  1. Alternative form of Chink

Anagrams[edit]