fuse

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: fusé

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: fyo͞oz, IPA(key): /fjuːz/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fuse
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Etymology 1[edit]

From Italian fuso and French fusée, from Latin fūsus (spindle).

Noun[edit]

fuse (plural fuses)

  1. A cord that, when lit, conveys the fire to some explosive device.
    • 1962 October, “Talking of Trains: Passed to you, Mr. Macmillan”, in Modern Railways, page 220:
      The Government, having lit the fuse, is not going to be allowed to flee the explosion.
  2. (manufacturing, mining, military) The mechanism that ignites the charge in an explosive device; a detonator.
    Synonym: fuze
  3. (figuratively) A tendency to lose one's temper.
    When talking about being laid off, he has a short fuse.
  4. A friction match for smokers' use, having a bulbous head which when ignited is not easily blown out even in a gale of wind.
  5. A kind of match made of paper impregnated with niter and having the usual igniting tip.
Usage notes[edit]

Professional publications about explosives and munitions distinguish the fuse and fuze spellings. The latter is preferred for the sense “mechanism that ignites the charge”.

Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fuse (third-person singular simple present fuses, present participle fusing, simple past and past participle fused)

  1. To furnish with or install a fuse to an explosive device (see Usage notes for noun above)

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from fusion (to melt), first to verbal sense, then noun.

Noun[edit]

fuse (plural fuses)

  1. (electrical engineering) A device to prevent excessive overcurrent from overload or short circuit in an electrical circuit, containing a component that melts and interrupts the current when too high a load is passed through it.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fuse (third-person singular simple present fuses, present participle fusing, simple past and past participle fused)

  1. (transitive) To liquify by heat; melt.
    • 1891, Dmitri Mendeleev, The Principles of Chemistry (1905) 3rd edition, Vol. 2, p.553, Tr. George Kamensky, of Основы химии (1867)
      Pure sodium is a lustrous metal... it fuses very easily at a temperature of 97°, and distils at a bright red heat (742°...)
  2. (transitive) To melt together; to blend; to mix indistinguishably.
    • 1960 January, “Talking of Trains: N.& W.-Virginian merger”, in Trains Illustrated, page 9:
      Actually the New York, New Haven and Hartford, Boston & Maine, Maine Central, Bangor & Aroostook and Rutland Railroads already are doing so; if they are fused, they would have a combined route mileage of 5,269 and assets totalling £318 million, [...].
  3. (intransitive) To melt together.
  4. (transitive, electricity) To furnish with or install a fuse to protect a circuit against overcurrent.
  5. (transitive, electricity, of a circuit) To have been protected against overcurrent by its fuse melting away, creating a gap in the wire, thus stopping the circuit from operating.
    When the bath overflowed, the downstairs lights fused, so we need a torch.
  6. (organic chemistry) To form a bicyclic compound from two similar or different types of ring such that two or more atoms are shared between the resulting rings
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fuse

  1. inflection of fuser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfu.ze/
  • Rhymes: -uze
  • Hyphenation: fù‧se

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of fuso

Participle[edit]

fuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of fuso

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

fuse f pl

  1. plural of fusa

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

fuse

  1. third-person singular past historic of fondere

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

fuse

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ふせ

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

fūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of fūsus

Adverb[edit]

fūsē (comparative fūsius, superlative fūsissimē)

  1. widely, extensively
  2. in great detail
  3. loosely, roughly

References[edit]

  • fuse”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fuse”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fuse in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

fuse (present tense fuser, past tense fuste, past participle fust)

  1. rush

Adjective[edit]

fuse

  1. inflection of fus:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • fusa (verb) (a infinitive)

Verb[edit]

fuse (present tense fusar, past tense fusa, past participle fusa, passive infinitive fusast, present participle fusande, imperative fuse/fus)

  1. rush

Adjective[edit]

fuse

  1. inflection of fus:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural
  2. neuter of fusen

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

fuse

  1. third-person singular simple perfect indicative of fi: he/she has been
Synonyms[edit]
  • fu (informal)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

fuse n

  1. indefinite plural of fus

Venetian[edit]

Verb[edit]

fuse

  1. first-person singular imperfect subjunctive of èser
  2. third-person singular imperfect subjunctive of èser
  3. third-person plural imperfect subjunctive of èser