latch

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: LATCH

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
A latch

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: lăch, IPA(key): /lætʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ætʃ

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English lacchen (to seize, catch, grasp, verb), from Old English læċċan (to grasp, take hold of, catch, seize), from Proto-Germanic *lakjaną, *lakwijaną, *lakkijaną (to seize), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)leh₂g-, *(s)leh₂gʷ- (to take, seize). Cognate with Middle Dutch lakken (to grasp, catch).

Verb[edit]

latch (third-person singular simple present latches, present participle latching, simple past and past participle latched)

  1. To close or lock as if with a latch.
  2. (transitive) To catch; lay hold of.
    • William Shakespeare, Macbeth
      Where hearing should not latch them.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English latche, lacche (a latch; a trap), from lacchen (to seize, catch, grasp), from Old English læċċan (to grasp, take hold of, catch, seize). See above for more.

Noun[edit]

latch (plural latches)

  1. A fastening for a door that has a bar that fits into a notch or slot, and is lifted by a lever or string from either side.
    • 1912: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes, Chapter 4
      The cleverly constructed latch which Clayton had made for the door had sprung as Kerchak passed out; nor could the apes find means of ingress through the heavily barred windows.
  2. A flip-flop electronic circuit
  3. (obsolete) A latching.
  4. (obsolete) A crossbow.
  5. (obsolete) That which fastens or holds; a lace; a snare.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of The Romaunt of the Rose to this entry?)
  6. A breastfeeding baby's connection to the breast.
  7. (databases) A lightweight lock to protect internal structures from being modified by multiple concurrent accesses.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare French lécher (to lick).

Verb[edit]

latch (third-person singular simple present latches, present participle latching, simple past and past participle latched)

  1. (obsolete) To smear; to anoint.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)