minder

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See also: Minder

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English mynder, mendowre (one who has a good memory; bears in mind; watches over; a keeper); equivalent to mind +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

minder (plural minders)

  1. One who minds, tends, or watches something such as a child, a machine, or cattle; a keeper.
  2. (Britain) A personal bodyguard.
  3. A monitor assigned by the authorities to someone, such as a foreign visitor (to exercise control over their contacts with the populace) or a journalist or someone who is speaking to journalists (to monitor and control what they say).
    • 1982, Paul Eddy, ‎Magnus Linklater, ‎Peter Gillman, The Falklands War (page 212)
      The twenty-eight journalists who sailed with the task force were accompanied by seven censors or 'minders' from the MoD, as well as by military press officers attached to each unit.
    • 2005, Roger V. Seifert, Tom Sibley, United They Stood: The Story of the UK Firefighters' Dispute 2002-4 (Lawrence & Wishart Limited):
      Once again the employers, now closely gripped by Central Government minders, offered 4 % now and 7 % in one year's time, and all tied to modernisation. This was not what the FBU had bargained for. So the strike started.
    • 2008, Poor George's Almanac: A 2008 Calendar (→ISBN), page 101:
      Pieter Tans, a 20-year National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) employee, was told not to use the phrase 'climate change' in paper titles and abstracts for the Seventh International Carbon Dioxide Conference. When an official flew in from Washington to be present for an interview Tans gave to the BBC, Mr. Tans wondered why a U.S. government “minder”, reminiscent of Iraq under Saddam Hussein, was required.
    • 2009, Thomas Rid, ‎Marc Hecker, War 2.0: Irregular Warfare in the Information Age (page 83)
      Rear Admiral John Woodward, the operational commander, summarized the instructions to the six MoD minders as “co-operation, yes; information, no.”
    • 2010 Oct, Tim Butcher, “Our Man in Liberia”, in History Today, volume 60, number 10, page 10-17:
      Throughout Greene's writing he repeatedly refers to dodging government control in Liberia, first by entering the country incognito and then by completing his journey without government minders.
    • 2015, Tony Harcup, Journalism: Principles and Practice, SAGE (→ISBN), page 79:
      [] some other journalists were becoming "embedded" with the military as one way of reporting from the front: living with the military, [] and reporting under military restrictions. Unsurprisingly, perhaps, embedded reporters tended to adopt the perspective of their hosts and minders, as US journalist Gordon Dillow later admitted []
    • 2016, Anna Fifield, I went to North Korea and was told I ask too many questions, The Washington Post (May 11, 2016):
      Was she really ill? Was she really a patient? We will never know. Suddenly, it was time to go and our minders were herding us back onto the bus.
  4. (obsolete) One who is taken care of, such as a pauper child in the care of private person; a ward.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

minder

  1. A cushion.

Declension[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

minder

  1. indefinite plural of minde

Verb[edit]

minder

  1. present of minde

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch minre, from Old Dutch minniro, from Proto-Germanic *minnizô, comparative of adjective deriving from Proto-Indo-European *mey- (small).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪndər

Determiner[edit]

minder

  1. comparative degree of weinig; less, fewer

Adverb[edit]

minder

  1. comparative degree of weinig; less

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

minder (used only predicatively, not comparable)

  1. worse, not as good
    De aardappelen waren heerlijk, maar de biefstuk was minder.
    The potatoes were delicious, but the steak was not as good.
  2. less fortunate
    We hebben de wedstrijd gewonnen, maar ik heb wel mijn enkel verzwikt, dus dat is minder.
    We won the competition, but I did sprain my ankle, so that's less fortunate.
Descendants[edit]
  • Negerhollands: minder

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German minder, minner, minre, from Old High German minniro, from Proto-Germanic *minnizô, comparative of adjective deriving from Proto-Indo-European *mey- (small). Originally the comparative form of min, of which the superlative is mindesten.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

minder (superlative mindesten)

  1. (now formal) comparative degree of wenig
  2. (now formal) comparative degree of gering

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch minderwaardig (inferior, third-rate).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɪn.dər/
  • Hyphenation: min‧dêr

Adjective[edit]

minder

  1. (colloquial) inferior.
    Synonym: rendah diri

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Same as mindre (less).

Conjunction[edit]

minder

  1. (rare) unless
    Synonym: med mindre

Adverb[edit]

minder

  1. (rare) else, otherwise
    Synonym: elles

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish مندر(minder).

Noun[edit]

minder m (Cyrillic spelling миндер)

  1. mat
  2. cushion
  3. divan (furniture)

Declension[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /minˈder/
  • Hyphenation: min‧der

Noun[edit]

minder (definite accusative minderi, plural minderler)

  1. cushion
  2. (sports) mat

Declension[edit]