-era

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin -aria, feminine form of -arius.

Suffix[edit]

-era f

  1. Used to form nouns meaning the location or object where something is usually found.
  2. Used to form nouns meaning a plant which is cultivated to produce something.
  3. Used to form nouns meaning the purpose of something or an object used for that purpose.

Usage notes[edit]

The equivalent suffix -er can be used to form masculine nouns with these meanings, but usually only the masculine or feminine form will be found in Catalan.

Suffix[edit]

-era f (masculine -er)

  1. Used to form nouns and adjectives referring to an inhabitant of somewhere.
  2. Used to form nouns and adjectives referring to engaging in a profession.
  3. Used to form nouns and adjectives referring to being prone to some activity or characteristic.

Usage notes[edit]

Because these senses are used to form adjectives of two forms or nouns referring to animate objects, both the masculine and feminine forms will be found in Catalan, with the lemma entry found at the masculine form.

Suffix[edit]

-era f

  1. Used to form nouns meaning the desire to undertake some task.

Usage notes[edit]

Unlike the other senses of this suffix, this meaning is used only to form feminine nouns.

See also[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-era f

  1. feminine form of -ero
  2. indicates a place or object where something can be found, kept or done
    Examples: guante (glove) → guantera (glove compartment) • regar (to water) → regadera (watering can)
  3. indicates a physical state or disability
    Examples: sordo (deaf) → sordera (deafness) • borracho (tdrunk) → borrachera (drunkness)
  4. forms names of certain plants or trees from the name of their fruit
    Examples: higo (fig) → higuera (fig tree) • mora (blackberry) → morera (blackberry plant)

Swedish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-era

  1. -ate, -ize; make a verb from a noun, similar to Swedish -a; used on loan-words with French -er and German -ieren

Derived terms[edit]