pink

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Pink

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pinks: common minnows

Origin unknown.

Noun[edit]

pink (plural pinks)

  1. (regional) The common minnow, Phoxinus phoxinus. [from 15th c.]
  2. (regional) A young Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, before it becomes a smolt; a parr. [from 17th c.]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch pincke.

Noun[edit]

pink (plural pinks)

  1. (now historical) A narrow boat. [from 15th c.]

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably from Low Dutch or Low German; compare Low German pinken ‘hit, peck’.

Verb[edit]

pink (third-person singular simple present pinks, present participle pinking, simple past and past participle pinked)

  1. To decorate a piece of clothing or fabric by adding holes or by scalloping the fringe.
  2. To prick with a sword.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 642:
      ‘Pugh!’ says she, ‘you have pinked a man in a duel, that's all.’
  3. To wound by irony, criticism, or ridicule.
  4. To choose; to cull; to pick out.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Herbert to this entry?)

Noun[edit]

pink (plural pinks)

  1. A stab.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Grose to this entry?)

Etymology 4[edit]

Pinks: carnation cultivars
Various shades of pink

Origin unknown; perhaps from the notion of the petals being pinked (Etymology 3, above).

Noun[edit]

pink (plural pinks)

  1. Any of various flowers in the genus Dianthus, sometimes called carnations. [from 16th c.]
    This garden in particular has a beautiful bed of pinks.
  2. (dated) A perfect example; excellence, perfection; the embodiment of some quality. [from 16th c.]
    Your hat, madam, is the very pink of fashion.
    • Shakespeare
      the very pink of courtesy
  3. The colour of this flower, between red and white; pale red. [from 17th c.]
    My new dress is a wonderful shade of pink.
    pink colour:    
  4. Hunting pink; scarlet, as worn by hunters. [from 18th c.]
    • 1928, Siegfried Sassoon, Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man, Penguin 2013, p. 23:
      I had taken it for granted that there would be people ‘in pink’, but these enormous confident strangers overwhelmed me with the visible authenticity of their brick-red coats.
    • 1986, Michael J O'Shea, James Joyce and Heraldry, SUNY, page 69:
      it is interesting to note the curious legend that the pink of the hunting field is not due to any optical advantage but to an entirely different reason.
  5. (snooker) One of the colour balls used in snooker, with a value of 6 points. [from 19th c.]
    Oh dear, he's left himself snookered behind the pink.
  6. (slang) An unlettered and uncultured, but relatively prosperous, member of the middle classes; compare babbitt, bourgeoisie.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pink (comparative pinker, superlative pinkest)

  1. Having a colour between red and white; pale red.
  2. Of a fox-hunter's jacket: scarlet.
  3. Having conjunctivitis.
  4. (obsolete) By comparison to red (communist), describing someone who sympathizes with the ideals of communism without actually being a Russian-style communist: a pinko.
    • 1976: Bhalchandra Pundlik Adarkar, The Future of the Constitution: A Critical Analysis
      The word "socialist" has so many connotations that it can cover almost anything from pink liberalism to red-red communism.
  5. (informal) Relating to women or girls.
    pink-collar; pink job
  6. (informal) Relating to homosexuals as a group within society.
    the pink economy
    pink dollar; pink pound
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

to be checked

  • Serbo-Croatian: ružičast(i)

Verb[edit]

pink (third-person singular simple present pinks, present participle pinking, simple past and past participle pinked)

  1. (transitive) To turn (a topaz or other gemstone) pink by the application of heat.

Etymology 5[edit]

Onomatopoeic

Verb[edit]

pink (third-person singular simple present pinks, present participle pinking, simple past and past participle pinked)

  1. (of a motor car) To emit a high "pinking" noise, usually as a result of ill-set ignition timing for the fuel used (in a spark ignition engine).
Translations[edit]

Etymology 6[edit]

Dutch pinken.

Verb[edit]

pink (third-person singular simple present pinks, present participle pinking, simple past and past participle pinked)

  1. (obsolete) To wink; to blink.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of L'Estrange to this entry?)

Adjective[edit]

pink (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Half-shut; winking.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Noun[edit]

pink m (plural pinken, diminutive pinkje n)

  1. pinkie (little finger)
  2. one-year-old calf
  3. a pink (ship - see Etymology 2)

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Noun[edit]

pink (genitive pingi, partitive pinki)

  1. bench
    Tšaikovski pink
    the Tchaikovsky bench

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English pink.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pink (comparative pinker, superlative am pinksten)

  1. coloured in a strong shade of pink

Usage notes[edit]

For paler shades, German does not use pink but rosa.

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pink n (uncountable)

  1. (slang) pee

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]