virus

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Virus, virüs, vírus, vīrus, and vīruss

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin virus (poison, slime, venom). First use in the computer context by David Gerrold in his 1972 book When HARLIE Was One.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus (plural viruses)

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies

The virions that carry the Marburg virus
  1. (archaic) Venom, as produced by a poisonous animal etc.
  2. A type of microscopic agent that causes an infectious disease; the disease so caused.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193: 
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola.
    He caught a virus and had to stay home from school.
  3. (pathology, microbiology, virology) A submicroscopic infectious organism, now understood to be a non-cellular structure consisting of a core of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat. It requires a living cell to replicate, and often causes disease in the host organism.
    • 2001, Leslie Iversen, Drugs: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford 2001, p. 64)
      Viruses are the smallest and most simplified forms of life.
  4. (computing) A computer virus.

Hyponyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus m (plural virus)

  1. virus

---


Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus m (plural virus)

  1. virus

Related terms[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus m

  1. virus

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus c, n (singular definite virussen or virusset, plural indefinite virus or virusser or vira, plural definite virussene or virusserne or viraene)

  1. virus

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus n (plural virussen, diminutive virusje n)

  1. (microbiology) virus
  2. (computer science) virus

Descendants[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Like most Latin borrowings, this word kept its original Latin gender (neuter); it is one of the few words ending in -us which is not masculine.


Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus

  1. virus

Declension[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus m (plural virus)

  1. virus

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin virus (poison, slime, venom).

Noun[edit]

virus m (plural virus)

  1. virus (pathogen)
  2. computer virus

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus m

  1. virus

Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia la

Etymology[edit]

Via rhotacism from Proto-Indo-European *wisos, *wīsos, *wiHsos. Cognates include Sanskrit विष (víṣa), Ancient Greek ἰός (iós), and and Tocharian B wase.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vīrus n (genitive vīrī); second declension

  1. venom
  2. poison

Inflection[edit]

Second declension neuter with nominative/accusative/vocative in -us.

Number Singular
nominative vīrus
genitive vīrī
dative vīrō
accusative vīrus
ablative vīrō
vocative vīrus

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus n (plural virusuri)

  1. virus

Declension[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

vírus m (Cyrillic spelling ви́рус)

  1. (medicine) virus (DNA/RNA causing disease)
  2. (computing) computer virus

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin virus.

Noun[edit]

virus m (plural virus)

  1. virus, computer virus

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

virus n

  1. virus