a'

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adverb[edit]

a' (not comparable)

  1. Alternative spelling of a (all). [First attested from 1350 to 1470.]

Adjective[edit]

a' (not comparable)

  1. Alternative spelling of a (all). [First attested from 1350 to 1470.]

Etymology 2[edit]

Preposition[edit]

a'

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of a (in)
    • 1661, Samuel Tuke, "The Adventures of Five Hours", in 1876, Robert Dodsley, William Carew Hazlitt, A Select Collection of Old English Plays, page 217:
      SIL. What, a' God's name, could come into the heads
      Of this people to make them rebel?
      ERN. Why, religion; that came into their heads
      A' God's name.
      GER. But what a devil made the noblemen
      Rebel? they never mind religion.

Bambara[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

a'

  1. you

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

a’

  1. (nonstandard) Contraction of an (used to form direct and indirect questions).
    • 1894 March 1, Peadar Mac Fionnlaoigh, “An rí nach robh le fagháil bháis”, in Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge, volume 1:5, Dublin: Gaelic Union, pages 185–88:
      Chonnaic sé cailín ag nigheachán i sruthán le cois an bhealaigh mhóir ⁊ chuir sé an tiománach síos ag fiafraighe di a’ bpósfadh sí é. [] Chuaidh an rí é féin síos annsin ⁊ d’fhiafraigh dhi a’ bpósfadh sí é.
      He saw a girl washing in a stream by the roadside, and he sent his driver down to ask her if she would marry him. [] The king himself then went down, and asked her would she marry him.

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

a'

  1. Truncated form of of ai

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English all, from Old English eall (all, every, entire, whole, universal), from Proto-West Germanic *all, from Proto-Germanic *allaz (all, whole, every), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂el- (all).

Determiner[edit]

a'

  1. all

Adverb[edit]

a' (not comparable)

  1. All.
    • 1825, Allan Cunningham, compiler, “Who’s at My Window”, in The Songs of Scotland, Ancient and Modern; [] In Four Volumes, volume III, London: Printed for John Taylor, [], OCLC 847583, page 334:
      There’s mirth in the barn and the ha’, the ha’, / There’s mirth in the barn and the ha’: / There's quaffing and laughing, / And dancing and daffing; / And our young bride’s daftest of a’, of a’, / And our young bride’s daftest of a’.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1852–1859, Lady John Scott (lyrics and music), “Annie Laurie”, in Scottish Songs[1]:
      / Like dew on the gowan lying / Is the fa' o' her fairy feet; / And like winds in summer sighing, / Her voice is low and sweet— / Her voice is low and sweet, / And she's a' the world to me, / And for bonnie Annie Laurie / I'd lay me doon and dee.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

a' (uncountable)

  1. all

References[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Article[edit]

a'

  1. inflection of an (the):
    1. dative or genitive singular masculine preceding b-, m- or p-
    2. nominative or dative singular feminine preceding b-, m-, p-
    Seall air a' corra-lod!Look at the mess!
Declension[edit]
Variation of a' (definite article)
Masculine Feminine Plural
nom. dat. gen. nom. dat. gen. nom. dat. gen.
+ f- am anL anL na na nam
+ m-, p- or b- am a'L a'L na na nam
+ c- or g- an anL anL na na nan
+ sV-, sl-, sn- or sr- an anT anT na na nan
+ other consonant an an an na na nan
+ vowel anT an an naH naH nan
L Triggers lenition; H Triggers H-prothesis; T Triggers T-prothesis

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Particle[edit]

a'

  1. (before consonants) Apocopic form of ag
    Tha Seoc a' fuireach ann an Glaschu. - Jock lives in Glasgow.
    Dè tha thu a' leughadh? - What are you reading?

Usage notes[edit]

  • In the Lewis dialect, ri is used instead.
  • Scottish Gaelic has no simple present tense of regular verbs, so that constructions with a', ag or ri are used for both simple and progressive present tenses in English.

Tarantino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Blend of a +‎ 'a

Preposition[edit]

a'

  1. at the

Yagaria[edit]

Noun[edit]

a'

  1. (Hua dialect) woman

References[edit]

  • John Haiman, Hua, a Papuan Language of the Eastern Highlands of New Guinea