cove

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See also: Cove

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Coved vault ceiling, Alhambra (Spain)
Cadgwith cove, Cornwall (United Kingdom)

From Middle English cove, from Old English cofa (chamber; den), from Proto-Germanic *kubô. Cognate with German Koben, Swedish kova. This word has probably survived as long as it has due to its coincidental phonetic resemblence to the unrelated word "cave".

Noun[edit]

cove (plural coves)

  1. (now uncommon) A hollow in a rock; a cave or cavern. [from 9th c.]
  2. (architecture) A concave vault or archway, especially the arch of a ceiling. [from 16th c.]
  3. A small coastal inlet, especially one having high cliffs protecting vessels from prevailing winds. [from 16th c.]
  4. (US) A strip of prairie extending into woodland.
  5. A recess or sheltered area on the slopes of a mountain. [from 19th c.]
  6. (nautical) The wooden roof of the stern gallery of an old sailing warship. [from 19th c.]
  7. (nautical) A thin line, sometimes gilded, along a yacht's strake below deck level. [from 19th c.]

(Can we add an example for this sense?)

Derived terms[edit]
in toponyms of New Brunswick
in toponyms of Newfoundland
in toponyms of Nova Scotia
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

cove (third-person singular simple present coves, present participle coving, simple past and past participle coved)

  1. (architecture) To arch over; to build in a hollow concave form; to make in the form of a cove.
    • 1779, Henry Swinburne, Travels through Spain
      The mosques and other buildings of the Arabians are rounded into domes and coved roofs.

Etymology 2[edit]

Britain ante-1570. From Romani kodo (this one, him), perhaps change in consonants due to lower class th-fronting, or Romani kova (that person).

Noun[edit]

cove (plural coves)

  1. (Britain, dated, informal, thieves' cant) A fellow; a man.
    • 1848 November – 1850 December, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 61, in The History of Pendennis. [], volume (please specify |volume=I or II), London: Bradbury and Evans, [], OCLC 2057953:
      Don’t call Major Pendennis an old cove, if you’ll ’ave the goodness, Lightfoot, and don’t call me an old cove, nether. Such words ain’t used in society; and we have lived in the fust society, both at ’ome and foring.
    • 2012, Terry Pratchett, Dodger, →ISBN, page 326:
      At one point, a friendly-looking sort of cove with silver hair and a grandfatherly kind of face beamed at him []
  2. (Australia and Polari) A friend; a mate.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare French couver, Italian covare. See covey.

Verb[edit]

cove (third-person singular simple present coves, present participle coving, simple past and past participle coved)

  1. To brood, cover, or sit over, as birds their eggs.
    • 1603, Plutarch, “Whether Creatvres Be More Wise, They of the Land, or Those of the Water”, in Philemon Holland, transl., The Philosophie, Commonlie Called, The Morals [], London: [] Arnold Hatfield, OCLC 1051546006, page 976:
      Moreover, the provident care of the tortoiſe in the generation, nouriſhment and preſervation of [h]er yooung, is woonderfull: for out ſhe goeth of the ſea, and laieth her egges or caſteth her ſpawne upon the banke ſide; but being not able to cove or ſit upon them, nor to remaine herſelfe upon the land out of the ſea any long time, ſhe beſtoweth them in the gravell, and afterwards covereth them with the lighteſt and fineſt ſand ſhe can get: []

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cophinus, from Ancient Greek κόφινος (kóphinos, basket).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cove m (plural coves)

  1. A large basket

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈko.ve/
  • Rhymes: -ove
  • Hyphenation: có‧ve

Noun[edit]

cove f

  1. plural of cova

Anagrams[edit]