cove

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See also: Cove

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Coved vault ceiling, Alhambra (Spain)
Cadgwith cove, Cornwall (United Kingdom)

From Middle English cove, from Old English cofa (chamber; den), from Proto-Germanic *kubô. Cognate with German Koben, Swedish kofva. This word has probably survived as long as it has due to its coincidental phonetic resemblence to the unrelated word "cave".

Noun[edit]

cove (plural coves)

  1. (now uncommon) A hollow in a rock; a cave or cavern. [from 9th c.]
  2. (architecture) A concave vault or archway, especially the arch of a ceiling. [from 16th c.]
  3. A small coastal inlet, especially one having high cliffs protecting vessels from prevailing winds. [from 16th c.]
    • (Can we date this quote by Holland and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      vessels which were in readiness for him within secret coves and nooks
  4. (US) A strip of prairie extending into woodland.
  5. A recess or sheltered area on the slopes of a mountain. [from 19th c.]
  6. (nautical) The wooden roof of the stern gallery of an old sailing warship. [from 19th c.]
  7. (nautical) A thin line, sometimes gilded, along a yacht's strake below deck level. [from 19th c.]

(Can we add an example for this sense?)

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

cove (third-person singular simple present coves, present participle coving, simple past and past participle coved)

  1. (architecture) To arch over; to build in a hollow concave form; to make in the form of a cove.
    • (Can we date this quote by H. Swinburne and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      The mosques and other buildings of the Arabians are rounded into domes and coved roofs.

Etymology 2[edit]

Britain ante-1570. From Romani kodo (this one, him), perhaps change in consonants due to lower class th-fronting, or Romani kova (that person).

Noun[edit]

cove (plural coves)

  1. (Britain, dated, informal, thieves' cant) A fellow; a man.
    • 2012, Terry Pratchett, Dodger, →ISBN, page 326:
      At one point, a friendly-looking sort of cove with silver hair and a grandfatherly kind of face beamed at him []
  2. (Australia and Polari) A friend; a mate.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare French couver, Italian covare. See covey.

Verb[edit]

cove (third-person singular simple present coves, present participle coving, simple past and past participle coved)

  1. To brood, cover, over, or sit over, as birds their eggs.
    • (Can we date this quote by Holland and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Not being able to cove or sit upon them [eggs], she [the female tortoise] bestoweth them in the gravel.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cophinus, from Ancient Greek κόφινος (kóphinos, basket).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cove m (plural coves)

  1. A large basket

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈko.ve/
  • Hyphenation: có‧ve

Noun[edit]

cove f

  1. plural of cova

Anagrams[edit]