ibis

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See also: Ibis and íbis

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
3 ibis

Etymology[edit]

Mentioned in the Wycliffe Bible as ybyn or ibin, as ibys from 16th century and ibis shortly after. From Latin ībis, from Ancient Greek ἶβις (îbis), from Egyptian

hbG26

(hbj) (compare Coptic ϩⲓⲃⲱⲓ (hibōi) or ϩⲓⲡ (hip))

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈaɪ.bɪs/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

ibis (plural ibis or ibises or ibides or ibes)

  1. Any of various long-legged wading birds in the family Threskiornithidae, having long downcurved bills used to probe the mud for prey such as crustaceans.
    • c. 1382–1395, John Wycliffe [et al.], Josiah Forshall and Frederic Madden, editors, The Holy Bible, [], volume I (in Middle English), Oxford: At the University Press, published 1850, OCLC 459166891, Leviticus XI:12–19, pages 315–316, column 2 and margin:
      Alle thingis in watris that han not fynnes and scalis, schulen be pollutid, These thingis ben of foulis whiche ȝe schulen not ete, and schulen be eschewid of ȝou; an egle, and a grippe, aliete, and a kyte, and a vultur by his kynde; and al of `rauyns kynde bi his licnesse; a strucioun, and nyȝt crowe, a lare, and an hauke bi his kinde; an owle, and dippere, and ibis*; a swan and cormoraunt, and a pellican; a fawcun, a iay bi his kynde; a leepwynke, and a reremows. [] ibis, that is, a ciconye, that etith paddokis and serpentis. bcgknqx. ibis, that is, an vnclene watir foule, that with his bille puttynge water into his ers, purgith himsilf. s.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, “Loomings”, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299, page 4:
      It is out of the idolatrous dotings of the old Egyptians upon broiled ibis and roasted river horse, that you see the mummies of those creatures in their huge bake-houses the pyramids.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ībis, from Ancient Greek ἶβις (îbis), from Egyptian
hbG26
(hby; hîbu).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ibis m (plural ibis)

  1. ibis

Further reading[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: i‧bis

Noun[edit]

ibis

  1. the Asiatic glassfish; any member of the family Ambassidae
  2. the Indian pellona (Pellona ditchella)

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ibis m

  1. ibis

Further reading[edit]

  • ibis in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ibis in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ibis, from Latin ibis, from Ancient Greek ἶβις (îbis), from Egyptian hbj.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈi.bɪs/, /ˈi.bəs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ibis

Noun[edit]

ibis m (plural ibissen, diminutive ibisje n)

  1. ibis, bird of the family

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ibis m (plural ibis)

  1. ibis

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ībis, from Ancient Greek ἶβις (îbis), from Egyptian hbj.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈi.bis/
  • Hyphenation: ì‧bis

Noun[edit]

ibis m (invariable)

  1. ibis

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

ībis

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἶβις (îbis), from Egyptian
hbZ4G26
(hbj).

Noun[edit]

ībis f (genitive ībis or ībidis); third declension

  1. ibis (wading bird)
    • c. 600 CE – 625 CE, Isidorus Hispalensis, Etymologiae 12.7.33:
      Ībis avis Nīlī flūminis, quae sēmetipsam pūrgat, rōstrō in ānum aquam fundēns. Haec serpentium ōva vēscitur, grātissimam ex eīs ēscam nīdīs suīs dēportāns.
      The ibis is a bird of the river Nile, which purges itself by pouring water into its anus with its beak. It devours the eggs of snakes, carrying from them to its nests the most welcome food.
Declension[edit]
Case Singular Plural
Nominative ībis ībēs
*ībidēs
Genitive *ībis
ībidis
ībium
*ībidum
Dative *ībī
*ībidī
*ībibus
*ībidibus
Accusative ībim
ībin
*ībem
*ībidem
ībidas
*ībidēs
Ablative ībide
*ībī
*ībibus
*ībidibus
Vocative *ībis *ībēs
*ībidēs
Notes[edit]

This noun can be inflected using two different stems (Greek and Latin). They are inconsistently used even within the same author's works; Cicero and Pliny the Elder use both the Latin declension:

    • c. 45 BCE, Cicero, Tusculanes 5.78:
      Aegyptiōrum mōrem quis ignōrat? quōrum inbūtae mentēs prāvitātis errōribus quamvīs carnificīnam prius subierint quam ībim aut aspidem aut faelem aut canem aut corcodillum violent, quōrum etiamsī inprūdentēs quippiam fēcerint, poenam nūllam recūsent.
      Who doesn't know the custom of the Egyptians? whose minds accustomed to delusions of wrongness would rather undergo as much torture as you want than desecrate the ibis or the asp or the cat or the crocodile, and to whom, even if one inadvertently did something to, he would not refuse any punishment.
    • c. 77 CE – 79 CE, Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia 30.142:
      Ībium cinere cum adipe ānseris et īrinō perūnctīs—sīc conceptōs partūs continērī.
      • 1855 translation by John Bostock
        The ashes of a burnt ibis, it is said, employed as a friction with goose-grease and oil of iris, will prevent abortion when a female has once conceived.

and the Greek:

    • 45 BCE, Cicero, De Natura Deorum 1.82:
      Etenim fāna multa spoliāta et simulācra deōrum dē locīs sānctissimīs ablāta vidēmus ā nostrīs, at vērō nē fandō quidem audītum est crocodīlum aut ībin aut faelem violātum ab Aegyptiō.
      Since we see many sanctuaries plundered and statues of gods carried away by our people from the holiest places, but it's not even heard of for a a crocodile or an ibis or a cat to be disrespected by an Egyptian.
    • c. 77 CE – 79 CE, Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia 30.61:
      Īnflātiōnēs discutit cocleārum cibus, tormina liēn ovium tostus atque ē vīnō potus, palumbis ferus ex poscā dēcoctus, adips ōtidis ex vīnō, cinis ībide sine pennīs cremātā potus.
      A diet of snails dispels flatulence, roasted sheep spleen taken with wine, wild woodpigeon taken with vinegar mixed with water, otis goose fat with wine, ashes from an ibis burnt without the feathers drunk, dispel colics.

while Ovid, most notably, uses exclusively the Greek declension:

    • 8 CE, Ovid, Metamorphoses 5.327–331:
      'Duxque gregis' dīxit 'fit Iuppiter; unde recurvīs
      nunc quoque fōrmātus Libys est cum cornibus Ammōn.
      Dēlius in corvō, prōlēs Semelēia caprō,
      fēle soror Phoebī, niveā Sāturnia vaccā,
      pisce Venus latuit, Cyllēnius ībidis ālīs.'
      'And leader of the flock' she said 'is made Jupiter;
      whence Lybian Ammon was also formed now with curved horns.
      Delius hid as a raven, his offspring Semeleia as a billy-goat,
      the sister of Phoebus as a cat, Saturnia as a snow-white cow,
      Venus as a fish, Cyllenius as the wings of an ibis.

The accusative plural form ībidas is encountered as well:

    • c. 43 CE, Pomponius Mela, De Situ Orbis libri III 3.82:
      Sunt multa volucrum multa serpentium genera: dē serpentibus memorandī maximē, quōs parvōs admodum et venēnī praesentis certō annī tempore ex līmō concrētārum palūdium ēmergere, in magnō exāmine volantēs Aegyptum tendere, atque in ipsō introitū fīnium ab avibus quās ibidas appellant adversō agmine excipī pugnaque cōnficī trāditum est.

Some forms, such as the nominative and genitive plural, are only attested in the Latin declension, while others, such as the genitive and ablative singular, in the Greek. The dative, ablative plural and vocative are unattested.

Descendants[edit]
  • English: ibis
  • French: ibis
  • Italian: ibis

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of (go, proceed).

Verb[edit]

ībis

  1. second-person singular future active indicative of

References[edit]

  • ibis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ibis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ibis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • ibis in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • ibis in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Old Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

ibis

  1. third-person singular preterite absolute of ibid

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ibis m anim

  1. ibis (bird)

Declension[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French ibis, from Latin ibis.

Noun[edit]

ibis m (plural ibiși)

  1. ibis

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈibis/, [ˈi.β̞is]

Noun[edit]

ibis m (plural ibis)

  1. ibis

Further reading[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Noun[edit]

ibis

  1. pagkaibis : relief from pain

Verb[edit]

ibis

  1. maibsan : to be relieved from
  2. ibisan : to unload