muller

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See also: Muller, Mueller, and Müller

English

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Etymology 1

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From mull (to heat and spice, etc., verb) +‎ -er (suffix forming agent nouns).[1][2]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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muller (plural mullers)

  1. One who, or that which, mulls.
    1. A person who mulls wine or other alcoholic beverages.
    2. A vessel in which wine, etc., is mulled over a fire.
Translations
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Etymology 2

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From mull (to mix (clay and sand) under a roller to prepare a mould) +‎ -er (suffix forming agent nouns).[3] Mull is possibly derived from mull ((chiefly Northern England) to grind to powder, crumble, powder, pulverize), from Middle English mollen, mullen (to moisten (something); to soften (something) by making wet; to become liquid; to drizzle; to crumble or soften (something) by grinding; to fondle or pet (something)),[4] from Old French moillier, muillier (to make wet) (modern French mouiller), and from its etymon Vulgar Latin *molliāre, *mulliāre (to make wet), from Latin molliāre, the present active infinitive of molliō (to soften), from Latin mollis (soft) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)meld- (to melt; to soften) or *melh₂- (to crush, grind)) + -iō (suffix forming factitive verbs from adjectives).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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muller (plural mullers)

  1. (metallurgy) A machine that mixes clay and sand under a roller for use in preparing a mould for metal casting.
    Synonym: sand muller
    • 2008, Stephen Chastain, Build a Muller[1], →ISBN, page 93:
      The muller can easily plow through any sand mixture that I put in it and has plenty of power left over.
Translations
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Etymology 3

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The noun is derived from Late Middle English molour, moler;[5] further origin uncertain, possibly:[6]

The verb is derived from the noun.[9]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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muller (plural mullers)

  1. (chiefly art, pharmacy) A stone with a flat grinding surface, which is held in the hand and rubbed on a slab to grind paint pigments, medicinal powders, etc.
    • 1994, John Wilder Tukey, David R. Brillinger, The collected works of John W. Tukey[2], →ISBN, page 607:
      The muller provides, in addition, a useful means of comparing the important property of the rate of strength development of pigments.
  2. (by extension) A device used for crushing or grinding.
Translations
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Verb

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muller (third-person singular simple present mullers, present participle mullering, simple past and past participle mullered)

  1. (transitive, obsolete, rare) To grind up (something) into, or as if into, powder.
    • 1848, On Lucifer Matches, in the Pharmaceutical Journal, volume 7 (1847-8), page 523:
      The mixing is conducted in a water-bath, and during this process, and as long as the phosphorus is being ground or ‘mullered,’ copious fumes are evolved.

Etymology 4

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Probably from Angloromani mul-, the preterite stem of mer- (to die) (compare mullered, mullo (dead, adjective);[10] ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *mer- (to die; to disappear)) + English -er (suffix forming frequentative verbs).[11]

Pronunciation

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Verb

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muller (third-person singular simple present mullers, present participle mullering, simple past and past participle mullered) (transitive, UK, slang)

  1. To destroy (something); to ruin, to wreck.
  2. To beat or thrash (someone).
    • 1990, Pete Davies, “All Played Out: England–Ireland”, in All Played Out: The Full Story of Italia ’90, London: Mandarin Paperbacks, published 1991, →ISBN, page 235:
      We walked down to the golf club to get a beer; they readily agreed as we went, it had been a dreadful game. Macca [Steve McMahon] asked Gazza [Paul Gascoigne], had he heard? – they were getting ‘mullered’ back home. [] Gazza said he wasn’t surprised, it was fair enough – and Macca said the same. He said he didn’t mind getting trashed, when they’d played a lousy game – what he hated was getting trashed for two weeks solid beforehand, when the Cup hadn’t even started.
    • 2001 June, Rebecca Tope, chapter 4, in Dark Undertakings, 1st St. Martin’s Minotaur (American) edition, New York, N.Y.: Thomas Dunne Books, →ISBN, section VIII, page 137:
      You needn't make so much fuss. Nobody's going to bother about you. It's me that's going to get mullered.
    • 2006, Jez Butterworth, The Winterling[3], →ISBN, page 39:
      Sure enough, they've got mullered. They're yesterday's men. The sands of time have washed over them.
    • 2007, Stephen Cole, Thieves Like Us, page 220:
      Then there were these zombie cult people in the beds, wires and stuff shoved into them, and then Yianna had these two minders and they were the ones who mullered us in Cairo, I swear, and one of them grabbed Con []
    • 2009, Martina Cole, Close, →ISBN, page 286:
      "They mullered him, Jimmy." Spider shook his head. "He was completely destroyed."
    • 2012, Anthony Cronshaw, Wednesday Rucks and Rock 'n' Roll: Tales from the East Bank:
      The boys couldn't stand idly by while three Wednesdayites got mullered; it was not the done thing.
  3. (often sports) To utterly defeat or outplay (a sportsperson, a team, etc.); to destroy, to thrash, to trounce.
    Synonym: outclass
Derived terms
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Translations
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Etymology 5

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Borrowed from German Müller, the surname of Franz Müller (1840–1864), a German tailor who was convicted and hanged for the robbery and murder of Thomas Briggs, a British banker, on a train. Müller was found in possession of, among other things, Briggs’ top hat, which he had altered by reducing the height of the crown by half and resewing it to the brim.[12][13]

Pronunciation

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Verb

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muller (third-person singular simple present mullers, present participle mullering, simple past and past participle mullered)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To cut down or reduce the height of (a top hat).
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  • Müller (top hat with a low or cut-down crown) (historical)

References

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  1. ^ Compare muller, n.4”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, July 2023.
  2. ^ muller2, n.”, in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  3. ^ Compare mull, v.”, in Collins English Dictionary.
  4. ^ mollen, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  5. ^ molǒur, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  6. ^ muller, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2024; muller1, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  7. ^ mull, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, July 2023.
  8. ^ † mullet, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, July 2023.
  9. ^ muller, v.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, July 2023.
  10. ^ Yaron Matras (2010) “Appendix I: Lexicon of Angloromani”, in Romani in Britain: The Afterlife of a Language, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, →ISBN, page 185; see also Charles G[odfrey] Leland (1873) “Gipsy Words which have Passed into English Slang”, in The English Gipsies and Their Language, London: Trübner & Co., [], →OCLC, page 94:‘To make a Mull of anything,’ meaning thereby to spoil or confuse it, if it be derived, as is said, from the Gipsy, must have come from Mullo meaning dead, and the Sanskrit Mara.
  11. ^ muller, v.4”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2023; muller2, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  12. ^ † muller, v.3”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, July 2023.
  13. ^ W[illia]m H. Peet (1902 October 25) “[Replies.] Fashion in Language.”, in Notes and Queries: A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, General Readers, etc., volume X (9th Series), London: John C[ollins] Francis, →OCLC, page 337, column 1:
    The term “Muller,” or “Muller-cut-down,” applied to a hat, referred to an incident connected with the murder of Mr. Briggs in a railway carriage on 9 July, 1864. The murderer was Franz Müller, and the fact that he was found with his victim’s hat was the most damning piece of evidence against him. The hat had been specially made for Mr. Briggs, but Müller had had it cut down in a way that was common in the second-hand hat trade. For some years after a low hat was spoken of as a “Muller-cut-down,” or a man was spoken of as having had his hat “mullered.”

Further reading

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Aragonese

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Aragonese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia an

Etymology

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From Latin mulierem.

Noun

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muller f (plural mullers)

  1. woman
  2. wife

Synonyms

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Catalan

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin mulierem.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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muller f (plural mullers)

  1. (law) wife
    Synonyms: cònjuge, (figurative) costella, dona, esposa
    Hypernym: cònjuge
    Coordinate terms: cònjuge, espòs, marit
    prendre mullerfor a man, to marry a woman

Further reading

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Galician

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Unha muller ("a woman")

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese mullermoller, from Latin mulierem.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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muller f (plural mulleres)

  1. woman
  2. wife

References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “muller”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “muller”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “muller”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • muller” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • muller” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Old Galician-Portuguese

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Noun

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muller f

  1. Alternative form of moller

Swedish

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Etymology

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Deverbal from mullra. Attested since 1730.

Noun

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muller n

  1. rumble

Declension

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Declension of muller 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative muller mullret
Genitive mullers mullrets

Derived terms

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See also

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  • kurrande (rumbling, growling) (of a stomach)

References

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