fi

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U+FB01, fi
LATIN SMALL LIGATURE FI

[U+FB00]
Alphabetic Presentation Forms
[U+FB02]

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

fi

  1. (music) The solfeggio syllable used to indicate the sharp of the fourth note of a major scale.

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation

Noun[edit]

fi (uncountable)

  1. (in combination) Abbreviation of fidelity. (e.g. in hi-fi or wi-fi)
  2. (in combination) Abbreviation of fiction. (e.g. in sci-fi)

Etymology 3[edit]

The word if spelled backwards, introduced in the ALGOL 68 Report (1968) as a terminator for an if clause.

Conjunction[edit]

fi

  1. (computer science) Reserved word, in some programming languages, signaling the end of an "if" program instruction.
    In ALGOL 68 the if clause must be terminated by fi (which is if spelt backwards).
Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

fi at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams[edit]


Bourguignon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin filius.

Noun[edit]

fi m (plural fis)

  1. son

Derived terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Occitan fin, from Latin fīnis.

Noun[edit]

fi f (plural fins)

  1. finish; the end
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the same source as the above (with similar occurrences in most Romance languages), or less likely, possibly originally from fidus, which also gave Old Occitan fi, phonetically[1].

Adjective[edit]

fi (feminine fina, masculine plural fins, feminine plural fines)

  1. fine, thin
  2. soft, smooth
  3. sharp, keen
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Latin phi, from Ancient Greek φεῖ (pheî).

Noun[edit]

fi f (plural fis)

  1. Phi; the Greek letter Φ (lowercase φ).

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “fi” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French fi.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Interjection[edit]

fi

  1. For shame!
    "Jes, mi frapis mian frateton kaj mi ne bedaŭras ĝin!" "Ho, fi!"
    "Yes, I hit my little brother and I'm not sorry about it!" "Oh, for shame!"
    Fi al vi!Shame on you!

Fas[edit]

Noun[edit]

fi

  1. water

References[edit]

  • ASJP, citing W. Baron, Kwomtari Survey (1983, SIL)

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Imitative.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

fi

  1. (archaic) faugh, fie, bah, pooh

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fīlius.

Noun[edit]

fi m (plural fis)

  1. son

Related terms[edit]


Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French fille (girl, daughter).

Noun[edit]

fi

  1. girl
  2. daughter

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See under fiú.

Noun[edit]

fi (plural fiak)

  1. (archaic, today only in compounds) son, child, offspring (of a human or an animal)
    Synonym: fiú
  2. (archaic, today only in compounds) a smaller part of a building or a piece of furniture, cf. fiók (drawer)
Declension[edit]

The accusative and the plural form can also be fiat and fiak, respectively, although fit, fik (the shorter versions) are more usual here.[1]

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative fi fik
accusative fit fikat
dative finak fiknak
instrumental fival fikkal
causal-final fiért fikért
translative fivá fikká
terminative fiig fikig
essive-formal fiként fikként
essive-modal
inessive fiban fikban
superessive fin fikon
adessive finál fiknál
illative fiba fikba
sublative fira fikra
allative fihoz fikhoz
elative fiból fikból
delative firól fikról
ablative fitól fiktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
fié fiké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
fiéi fikéi
Inflection (stem in -a-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative fi fiak
accusative fiat fiakat
dative finak fiaknak
instrumental fival fiakkal
causal-final fiért fiakért
translative fivá fiakká
terminative fiig fiakig
essive-formal fiként fiakként
essive-modal
inessive fiban fiakban
superessive fin fiakon
adessive finál fiaknál
illative fiba fiakba
sublative fira fiakra
allative fihoz fiakhoz
elative fiból fiakból
delative firól fiakról
ablative fitól fiaktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
fié fiaké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
fiéi fiakéi

The possessive-suffixed forms can also be fim etc., although the fiam etc. forms (the longer versions) are more usual here.[1]

Possessive forms of fi
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. fiam fiaim
2nd person sing. fiad fiaid
3rd person sing. fia fiai
1st person plural fiunk fiaink
2nd person plural fiatok fiaitok
3rd person plural fiuk fiaik
Possessive forms of fi
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. fim fiaim
2nd person sing. fid fiaid
3rd person sing. fija fiai
1st person plural fink fiaink
2nd person plural fitok fiaitok
3rd person plural fijuk fiaik
Derived terms[edit]
Compound words with this term at the beginning
Compound words with this term at the end

Etymology 2[edit]

Interjection[edit]

fi

  1. (rare, literary) yuck, ugh, boo (expression of disgust or contempt, sometimes like a symbolic spitting)
    Synonyms: fuj, pfuj

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin phi, from Ancient Greek φεῖ (pheî).

Noun[edit]

fi (plural fik) (the plural form is rare)

  1. Phi; the Greek letter Φ (lowercase φ).
Declension[edit]

(suffixed forms are rare)

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative fi fik
accusative fit fiket
dative finek fiknek
instrumental fivel fikkel
causal-final fiért fikért
translative fivé fikké
terminative fiig fikig
essive-formal fiként fikként
essive-modal
inessive fiben fikben
superessive fin fiken
adessive finél fiknél
illative fibe fikbe
sublative fire fikre
allative fihez fikhez
elative fiből fikből
delative firől fikről
ablative fitől fiktől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
fié fiké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
fiéi fikéi

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • (son): fi in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (yuck): fi in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Jamaican Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English for.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɪ/
  • Hyphenation: fi

Preposition[edit]

fi

  1. for
    • 2016, Sylvia Gilfillian, The Road to Timnath: Di Ruod Tu Timnat, →ISBN:
      “A wanda how dem come fi tink dat di trial a di pastor is a fittin event fi a pikni witness. []
      I asked myself how they could possibly think that the pastor's trial would be an appropriate event for children to see. []
    Mi head a hot mi. Yuh have supn can gimme fi it?
    I have a headache. Can you give me something for the pain?
  2. (+ infinitive) to
    • 2016, Sylvia Gilfillian, The Road to Timnath: Di Ruod Tu Timnat, →ISBN:
      “Me look up to di platform and see about eight wooden chairs up deh. Me eyeball dem fi see which wan a dem me kuda move because some a dem carve outa solid wood and look well heavy. []
      I looked up at the platform and saw about eight wooden chairs up there. I studied them to see which one I could move because some of them were made of solid wood and looked extremely heavy. []
    Wi wah fi know wah gwaan.
    We want to know what's going on.
  3. (interrogative) (+ infinitive) can
    • 2018, Shelley Sykes-Coley, Chat ’Bout!: An Anthology of Jamaican Conversations, →ISBN:
      “How unnu fi walk an' nyam, an' litter di street?
      Mi jus' cyaan andastan' how unno fi dweet. []
      How can you walk and eat, and throw litter in the street?
      I just can't understand how you can do it. []
    How dem fi do dat?
    How can they do a thing like that?
  4. (+ infinitive) should
    • 2013, Selvin McRae, The Guilty Truth Revealed, →ISBN, page 108:
      “Mi pickney unnu fi look n love nuff money
      Horse pon track cah gallop without money []
      My children, you should seek and desire a lot of money
      A horse on a track can't race without money []
    Im fi tap it. It a guh mash 'im up.
    He/She should stop doing that. It's going to wreck him/her.

Further reading[edit]

  • Richard Allsopp (main editor), Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage, 2003 (reprint by The University of the West Indies Press, originally 1996 by Oxford University Press), ISBN 9789766401450 (originally ISBN-10: 976-640-145-4), page 229
  • fi – jamaicans.com Jamaican Patois dictionary

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

fi

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ふぃ
  2. Rōmaji transcription of フィ

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

  1. pah!, pooh!, foh!, bah!, an expression of disgust
    Fi, fi fetet!
    Pah, it stinks!

Descendants[edit]

  • English: fy, fie

Verb[edit]

  1. second-person singular present passive imperative of faciō

References[edit]

  • fi in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fi in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fi m (plural fi)

  1. phi (name of the Greek letter Φ)

Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • фи (Moldavian Cyrillic spelling)

Etymology[edit]

Suppletive verb formed from Latin sum, fuī, with the infinitive and subjunctive forms replaced by fierī, present active infinitive of fīō. Latin sum derives from Proto-Italic *ezom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti (I am, I exist), while fīō and fuī both derive from Proto-Italic *fuiō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to grow, become, come into being, appear).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

a fi (third-person singular present este or e, past participle fost4th conj.

  1. (with a predicate adjective or predicate nominative) to be
    Ea este frumoasă.She is beautiful.
    Aceasta este o casă.This is a house.
  2. (with a predicate adjective and an indirect object) to feel (to experience a certain condition)
    Îmi e frig.I feel cold. (literally, “To me is cold.”)
    Îmi este rău.I feel sick.

Usage notes[edit]

  • One can also use e as an informal variant of the third-person singular present tense, este.
  • The second entries in the simple perfect row represent the informal variants.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin focus (hearth, fireplace).

Noun[edit]

fi m

  1. (Surmiran) fire

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fi f (plural fíes)

  1. phi; the Greek letter Φ, φ

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *mī.

Pronoun[edit]

fi

  1. I, me
See also[edit]
  • i (I, me)
  • mi (I, me)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

fi f (plural fiau, not mutable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter V.

See also[edit]


Yoruba[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /fí/

Noun[edit]

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter F.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /fi/

Verb[edit]

fi

  1. (auxiliary verb) to use something to do something else (must be used with another verb)
Usage notes[edit]

This verb cannot be used on its own with an object and must be used with a second verb to show purpose. In the case of simply using an object without any purpose, must be used instead.

  1. "Mo fi ṣíbí jẹ ìrẹsì." – I used a spoon to eat rice. (uses a second verb, jẹ, along with fi)
  2. "Mo lo ṣíbí." – I used a spoon. (uses , changed to lo before an object noun, since there's no second verb for purpose)

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /fí/

Verb[edit]

  1. (transitive) to swing
  2. (transitive) to swirl, to centrifuge