Brexit

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: brexit

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
“Vote Leave” and “Vote Remain” posters displayed in windows in Pimlico, London
A map showing the results of the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum on 23 June 2016. Areas in yellow indicate districts that voted in favour of remaining within the Union; those in blue voted to leave.

Etymology[edit]

Blend of Britain +‎ exit, formed by analogy with Grexit.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɹɛɡzɪt/, /ˈbɹɛksɪt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: Brex‧it

Proper noun[edit]

Brexit

  1. (UK politics) The withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union.
    Antonym: Bremain
    • 2012 May 15, Peter Wilding, “Stumbling towards the Brexit”, in EurActiv[1], archived from the original on 24 June 2016:
      Unless a clear view is pushed that Britain must lead in Europe at the very least to achieve the completion of the single market then the portmanteau for Greek euro exit might be followed by another sad word, Brexit.
    • 2015, Denis MacShane, Brexit: How Britain Will Leave Europe, London: I.B. Tauris, →ISBN, page 6:
      The business community began to take the idea of Brexit seriously. Three major American banks, the Bank of America, Citibank and Morgan Stanley, revealed they were working on contingency plans to relocate from London to Dublin []
    • 2016 June 24, Kate McCann, “EU referendum live: David Cameron resigns after UK shocks the world by voting for Brexit”, in The Daily Telegraph[2], archived from the original on 24 June 2016:
      David Cameron has resigned as Prime Minister after Britain voted to leave the European Union. It followed a turbulent night with Remain campaigners quietly confident until the early hours when results from Newcastle and Sunderland showed better than expected returns for the Brexit camp. A surprise victory for a Brexit in Swansea, which was expected to vote to Remain, did little to dampen concerns despite Scotland overwhelmingly backing staying in the Union.
    • 2016 August 1, Alex Barker; Jim Brunsden, “Eurocrats’ pensions shape up to be flashpoint in Brexit talks”, in The Financial Times, London:
      The pensions of British Eurocrats are shaping up to be one of the most politically poisonous points in the UK’s Brexit talks, as the EU and London prepare to clash over liabilities running to several billion euros.
    • 2017 June 19, Michel Barnier, “Brexit Negotiations: David Davis says ‘Promising Start’ Made”, in BBC News:
      We must lift the uncertainty caused by Brexit.
    • 2018 March 7, Daniel Boffey; Jennifer Rankin, “EU scorns UK’s ‘pick and mix’ approach to trade post-Brexit”, in The Guardian, London:
      [Donald] Tusk said: “Our agreement will not make trade between the UK and the EU frictionless or smoother. It will make it more complicated and costly than today, for all of us. This is the essence of Brexit.”
    • 2018 June 5, “Brexit poll reveals record number of voters think decision to leave EU is wrong”, in The Independent[3], London:
      Meanwhile, The Sunday Times revealed that civil servants had warned of a “Doomsday Brexit” if no agreement is reached, creating shortages of medicine, fuel and food.
    • 2018 June 23, “Brexit: Theresa May 'not bluffing' in threat to leave EU without a deal, Tory minister Liam Fox says”, in The Independent[4], London:
      "It's all incredibly unhelpful and what we need to do now is to get closer with our European partners and work out what a realistic, pragmatic Brexit is that works for both sides, the EU and ourselves."
    • 2019, David Miliband, As foreign secretary I argued against an EU referendum. Now I back one in the Guardian.
      A further referendum is not just a way for voters to decide whether to incur the economic and social cost of a final Brexit deal.

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from Brexit

Related terms[edit]

Terms related to Brexit

Coordinate terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

Brexit (third-person singular simple present Brexits, present participle Brexiting, simple past and past participle Brexited)

  1. (of Britain) To exit the European Union.
    • 2015, Stefano Francesco Fugazzi, Brexit?, →ISBN, page 27:
      Brexiting the EU, not leaving Europe
    • 2016, Owen Bennet, chapter 10, in The Brexit Club: The Inside Story of the Leave Campaign’s Shock Victory, →ISBN:
      [Nigel] Farage recalls: What was clear from that polling was that in June 2015 the most trusted person in the country on whether to Brexit or not to Brexit was David Cameron.
    • 2016, Maureen Dowd, “Unconventional Conventions”, in The Year of Voting Dangerously: The Derangement of American Politics, →ISBN:
      Parisiens I had talked to were universally disgusted: with David Cameron, for holding the vote; with the British, for Brexiting; []
  2. (slang, by extension) To leave a romantic relationship. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Brexit

  1. (politics) Brexit

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Brexit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Brexit m

  1. Brexit
    • 2014 July 17, Nicolas Baverez, “Le Brexit ou l'absurdité du siècle”, in Le Point[5]:
      Le Brexit (British exit) ou sortie du Royaume-Uni de l'Union européenne paraît pratiquement inéluctable.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2016, Danielle Auroi, Rapport d'information de la commission des affaires européennes sur les négociations de l'Union européenne avec le Royaume Uni relatives à son maintien au sein de l'Union[6], page 18:
      Début janvier, David Cameron a finalement accepté de laisser les ministres de son cabinet faire campagne en faveur du Brexit s'ils le souhaitaient, à titre privé et individuel.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2016 June 24, “Résultat du référendum sur le Brexit”, in Le Huffington Post[7]:
      Le Brexit, ou British Exit, était en tête avec près de 51,7% des voix après dépouillement dans 300 des 382 centres du pays, peu avant 5h, selon le décompte officiel, grâce à des résultats largement favorables dans plusieurs villes du nord de l'Angleterre et au Pays de Galles.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2018, AFP agence, “Brexit: «Seul un accord de libre-échange est possible», prévient Donald Tusk”, in Le Figaro:
      Le Brexit «conduira inévitablement à des frictions» commerciales entre l'UE et le Royaume-Uni, étant donné le souhait britannique de quitter le marché unique et l'union douanière
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2018, AFP agence, “Brexit: «Seul un accord de libre-échange est possible», prévient Donald Tusk”, in Le Figaro:
      Les tractations sur les futurs liens commerciaux entre l'UE et le Royaume-Uni n'ont pas encore démarré, les discussions s'étant jusqu'ici concentrées sur la préparation du traité scellant le Brexit, avec de lourds dossiers comme la facture du divorce, le sort des expatriés et l'avenir de la frontière irlandaise.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. Brexit dur: hard brexit
    • 2018 April 28, Benoît Floc'h, “Le gouvernement prépare les douanes à un Brexit dur”, in Le Monde[8]:
      l’absence d’accord. C’est le Brexit dur. La frontière serait immédiatement et totalement rétablie en mars 2019.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Brexit m (genitive Brexits, no plural)

  1. (politics) Brexit

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Brexit.

Proper noun[edit]

Brexit m

  1. Brexit
    • 2015 May 25, Pablo R. Suanzes, “Brexident, más que Brexit”, in El Mundo[9]:
      Con la campaña electoral británica y el giro a la derecha, por así llamarlo, de David Cameron, otro concepto se ha hecho bastante popular en los pasillos de las instituciones, el de 'Brexit'.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2015 November 26, Roberto Casado, “El gran riesgo de 2016 para los mercados es el 'Brexit'”, in Expansión[10]:
      Los inversores apenas han reaccionado al sondeo, el primero que otorga la victoria a los partidarios del Brexit.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2016 June 24, Carolina Enriquez, “Cinco efectos que podría generar el Brexit en Ecuador”, in El Comercio[11]:
      Hasta antes del Brexit, estas personas sí tenían libertad para laborar en territorios británicos.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2018 March 7, Lucía Abellán, “La UE enfría las expectativas de May y solo ofrece un acuerdo comercial tras el Brexit”, in El Pais:
      El acuerdo comercial no hará la relación comercial más fácil. Será más complicada. Esa es la esencia del Brexit
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2018 March 7, Lucía Abellán, “La UE enfría las expectativas de May y solo ofrece un acuerdo comercial tras el Brexit”, in El Pais:
      No habrá ganadores tras el Brexit. Las dos partes pierden
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Further reading[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Brexit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Brexit m

  1. Brexit

Usage notes[edit]

This noun cannot usually be mutated.

Synonyms[edit]