bom

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See also: BOM and BoM

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Name after the sound it makes (onomatopoeia).

Noun[edit]

bom (plural boms)

  1. (zoology, obsolete) A large snake found in America.
    • 1742, Charles Owen, An Essay Towards a Natural History of Serpents
      The Bom-Snake, is another Brazilian Reptile, call'd Bom from the Noise it makes in its Motion.
    • 1819, Abraham Rees, The Cyclopaedia
      It is said to grow to a vast size, and to be perfectly harmless; but the latter assertion is improbable; it is not certainly of the poisonous race of serpents. This is called the bom, because it emits a remarkable noise resembling the sound of that word, when pronounced with a deep hollow voice.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Noun[edit]

bom c (singular definite bommen, plural indefinite bomme)

  1. bar, tollbar
  2. barrier (rail)
  3. beam
  4. boom

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bom f, m (plural bommen, diminutive bommetje n)

  1. bomb

Derived terms[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Dutch boom.

Noun[edit]

bom

  1. tree

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Baum or German Low German Boom.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bom m (diminutive bomk)

  1. tree
    • 2011 September 27, I. Neumannojc, "Sadowe bomy za derjeměśe luźa a natury", Nowy Casnik:
      Sadowe bomy w burskich gumnach a teke na dwórach su typiske za naš region.
      Fruit trees in farmers' gardens and even in courtyards are typical for our region.

Declension[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German bom

Noun[edit]

bom m (definite singular bommen, indefinite plural bommer, definite plural bommene)

  1. a boom (for a sail, crane, microphone etc.)
  2. a barrier (at a railway crossing etc.)
  3. a beam (in gymnastics: balance beam)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German bom

Noun[edit]

bom m (definite singular bommen, indefinite plural bommar, definite plural bommane)

  1. a boom (as above)
  2. a barrier (as above)
  3. a beam (as above)

References[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *baumaz.

Noun[edit]

bōm m

  1. a tree

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese bõo, from Latin bonus (good).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bom (feminine boa, masculine plural bons, feminine plural boas)

  1. good

Antonyms[edit]

Interjection[edit]

bom

  1. well, very well

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Verb[edit]

bom

  1. first-person singular future form of biti.

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

bom c

  1. barrier (rail)
  2. miss, failure to hit
  3. boom (sail)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): /ˀɓɔm˧˧/
  • (Huế) IPA(key): /ˀɓɔm˧˧/
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): /ˀɓɔm˧˥/

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from French bombe. Compare English bomb.

Noun[edit]

bom

  1. bomb

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from French pomme.

Noun[edit]

bom

  1. apple
Synonyms[edit]

Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

bom (plural boms)

  1. bone

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • SARMENTO, Leila Lauar. Gramática em textos. 2 edition. São Paulo, Brazil: Moderna, 2005.