pique

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See also: Pique and piqué

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle French pique (a prick, sting), from Old French pic (a sharp point).[1] Doublet of pike (long pointed weapon).

Noun[edit]

pique (countable and uncountable, plural piques)

  1. A feeling of enmity between two entities; ill-feeling, animosity; a transient feeling of wounded pride.
    • Dr. H. More
      Men take up piques and displeasures.
    • De Quincey
      Wars had arisen [] upon a personal pique.
  2. A feeling of irritation or resentment, awakened by a social slight or injury; offence, especially taken in an emotional sense with little thought or consideration.
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 7:
      This defiance was not a fit of pique, but a matter of principle.
    • Sweet Smell of Success (1957) screenplay by Clifford Odets and Ernest Lehman, starring Burt Lancaster as J.J. Hunsecker who says:
      You think this is a personal thing with me? Are you telling me I think of this in terms of a personal pique?
  3. (obsolete) Keenly felt desire; a longing.
    • Hudibras
      Though it have the pique, and long, / 'Tis still for something in the wrong.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pique (third-person singular simple present piques, present participle piquing, simple past and past participle piqued)

  1. (transitive) To wound the pride of; to sting; to nettle; to irritate; to fret; to excite to anger.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 11
      She treated him indulgently, as if he were a child. He thought he did not mind. But deep below the surface it piqued him.
    • Byron
      Pique her and soothe in turn.
  2. (reflexive) To take pride in; to pride oneself on.
    • John Locke
      Men [] pique themselves upon their skill.
  3. (transitive) To excite (someone) to action by causing resentment or jealousy; to stimulate (a feeling, emotion); to offend by slighting.
    I believe this will pique your interest.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French pic.

Noun[edit]

pique (plural piques)

  1. In piquet, the right of the elder hand to count thirty in hand, or to play before the adversary counts one.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Spanish pique, from Central Quechua piki.

Noun[edit]

pique (plural piques)

  1. A chigger or jigger, Tunga penetrans.

Etymology 4[edit]

From French piqué from past participle of French piquer (to prick, quilt)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pique (countable and uncountable, plural piques)

  1. A durable ribbed fabric made from cotton, rayon, or silk.

References[edit]

  1. ^ pique” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pique f (plural piques)

  1. pike, lance
  2. (card games) spade (as a card suit)
    • quatre de pique = four of spades

Verb[edit]

pique

  1. First- and third-person singular indicative present of piquer
  2. First- and third-person singular subjunctive present of piquer
  3. Ordinary second-person singular imperative present of piquer

External links[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French picque (a prick, sting), from Old French pic (a sharp point).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pique m (plural piques)

  1. any spear
  2. or specifically a pike
  3. hide-and-seek (game)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

pique

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of picar (sting)
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of picar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of picar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of picar

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

pique m (plural piques)

  1. (card games) spade
  2. downward movement
    irse a pique (sink [for a ship])
  3. hit, fix (of drugs)
  4. rivalry, needle, loggerheads
  5. grudge match

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

pique

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of picar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of picar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of picar.