wale

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wale, from Old English walu (ridge, bank; rib, comb (of helmet); metal ridge on top of helmet; weal, mark of a blow), from Proto-Germanic *waluz (stick, root), from Proto-Indo-European *welʷ- (to turn, wind, roll). Akin to Low German wāle; Old Norse vala (knuckle).

Noun[edit]

wale (plural wales)

  1. A ridge or low barrier.
  2. A raised rib in knit goods or fabric, especially corduroy. (As opposed to course)
  3. The texture of a piece of fabric.
  4. (nautical) A horizontal ridge or ledge on the outside planking of a wooden ship. (See gunwale, chainwale)
  5. A horizontal timber used for supporting or retaining earth.
  6. A timber bolted to a row of piles to secure them together and in position.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  7. A ridge on the outside of a horse collar.
  8. A ridge or streak produced on skin by a cane or whip.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

wale (third-person singular simple present wales, present participle waling, simple past and past participle waled)

  1. To strike the skin in such a way as to produce a wale.
    • 1832: Owen Felltham, Resolves, Divine, Moral, Political
      Would suffer his lazy rider to bestride his patie: back, with his hands and whip to wale his flesh, and with his heels to dig into his hungry bowels?
    • 2002: Hal Rothman, Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century
      When faced with an adulthood that offered few options, grinding poverty and marriage to a man who drank too much and came home to wale on his own family or...no beatings.
  2. To give a surface a texture of wales.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Middle English wal, wale, from Old Norse val (choice), from Proto-Germanic *walą, *walō (desire, choice), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)welə- (to choose, wish). Akin to Old Norse velja (to choose), Old High German wala "choice" (German wählen "to choose"), Old English willan (to want). More at will.

Noun[edit]

wale (plural wales)

  1. Something selected as being the best, preference; choice.

Verb[edit]

wale (third-person singular simple present wales, present participle waling, simple past and past participle waled)

  1. to choose, select.

Anagrams[edit]


Fulniô[edit]

Noun[edit]

wale

  1. pig

References[edit]

  • 2009 (originally 1968), Douglas Meland, Doris Meland, Fulniô (Yahthe) Syntax Structure: Preliminary Version, Associação Internacional de Linguística - SIL Brasil, page 19.

Hawaiian[edit]

Noun[edit]

wale

  1. phlegm
  2. saliva

Particle[edit]

wale

  1. Used to modify the preceding word only, just, alone; quite, very; simply, for free, without reason

Middle Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wale

  1. Alternative form of wel

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English wal, wale, from Old Norse val (choice), from Proto-Germanic *walą, *walō (desire, choice), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)welə- (to choose, wish). Akin to Old Norse velja (to choose), Old High German wala "choice" (German wählen "to choose"), Old English willan (to want).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wale (plural wales)

  1. choice, selection

Verb[edit]

tae wale (third-person singular simple present wales, present participle walin, simple past waled, past participle waled)

  1. to choose