absolver

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

absolve +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /æbˈzɑl.vɚ/, /əbˈzɑl.vɚ/

Noun[edit]

absolver (plural absolvers)

  1. Agent noun of absolve; one who absolves. [First attested in the late 16th century.][1]
    • c. 1594, William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act III, Scene 3,[1]
      [] how hast thou the heart,
      Being a divine, a ghostly confessor,
      A sin-absolver, and my friend profess’d,
      To mangle me with that word ‘banished’?
    • 1684, Richard Baxter, Whether Parish Congregations Be True Christian Churches, London: Thomas Parkhurst, p. 2,[2]
      [] few men dislike the Lay-Excommunicators and Absolvers more than I do []

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “absolver” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, →ISBN, page 9.

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

absolver

  1. (transitive) to absolve

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

absolver (first-person singular present indicative absolvo, past participle absolvido)

  1. to absolve
  2. (law) To acquit
  3. to forgive

Conjugation[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin absolvere, present active infinitive of absolvō (absolve).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /absolˈbeɾ/, [aβsolˈβeɾ]

Verb[edit]

absolver (first-person singular present absuelvo, first-person singular preterite absolví, past participle absuelto)

  1. to absolve
  2. to acquit

Conjugation[edit]

  • Rule: o becomes a ue in stressed syllables. Irregular in the past participle.

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]