ait

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See also: áit, AIT, and aitt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English eyt, eit, from Old English īġeoþ, īgoþ, iggaþ, iggoþ ‎(ait, eyot, islet, small island), diminutive of īġ, ēġ, īeġ ‎(island). More at eyot.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

ait ‎(plural aits)

  1. An island in a river, especially the River Thames in England.
    • R. Hodges (1649)
      The ait where the osiers grew.
    • 1833, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Autobiography: Truth and Fiction Relating to My Life trans. John Oxenford, book 9,
      Striking richness of vegetation which follows in the windings of the Rhine, marks its banks, islands, and aits.
    • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, ch. 1,
      Fog everywhere. Fog up the river, where it flows among green aits and meadows.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Scots ait, ate, from Middle English ate, from Old English āte. More at oat.

Noun[edit]

ait ‎(plural aits)

  1. (Scotland) An oat.
    • 1785, Robbie Burns, Scotch Drink
      Let husky wheat the haughs adorn,
      An' aits set up their awnie horn,

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. barn

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ait

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of avoir

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish aitt ‎(pleasant, agreeable; strange, unusual, adjective).

Adjective[edit]

ait ‎(genitive singular masculine ait, genitive singular feminine aite, plural aite, comparative aite)

  1. pleasant, likeable
  2. fine, excellent
  3. comical; queer
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
  • aiteacht f ‎(queerness, oddness)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

ait m

  1. genitive singular of at

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ait n-ait hait t-ait
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "ait" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • aitt” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

āit, ait

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of āiō
  2. it is said (that)

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • aït (scholarly convention)

Verb[edit]

ait

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of aidier

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ait

  1. (literary) second-person singular imperfect / conditional of mynd

Synonyms[edit]

  • aet (colloquial)
  • elet (colloquial)