bardo

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See also: Bardo and bardò

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Folios 35 and 67 of a manuscript of the Bardo Thodol (Liberation through Hearing during the Intermediate State),[1] often known in the West as the Tibetan Book of the Dead. The text is intended as a guide through the after-death experiences that a person’s consciousness has in the bardo.

Borrowed from Tibetan བར་དོ (bar do), from བར (bar, interval) + དོ (do, two).[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bardo (uncountable)

  1. (Tibetan Buddhism) The state of existence between death and subsequent reincarnation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Published in Kazi Dawa Samdup, transl.; Marguerite La Fuente, transl. (1933), W[alter] Y[eeling] Evans-Wentz, editor, Bardo Thödol, le livre des morts tibétain, ou les expériences d'après la mort dans le plan du “Bardo”, suivant la version anglaise du lama Kazi Dawa Samdup, éditeé par [...] W. Y. Evans-Wentz, [...] Traduction française de Marguerite La Fuente, [...] [Bardo Thodol: The Tibetan Book of the Dead, or Experiences after Death in the Plan of “Bardo”, According to the English Version of the Lama Kazi Dawa Samdup, edited by [...] W. Y. Evans-Wentz, [...] French Translation by Marguerite La Fuente, [...]], Paris: Adrien-Maisonneuve, OCLC 458574851.
  2. ^ bardo” (US) / “bardo” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eo

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin bardus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbardo/
  • Hyphenation: bar‧do

Noun[edit]

bardo (accusative singular bardon, plural bardoj, accusative plural bardojn)

  1. bard

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bardus, from Gaulish, from Proto-Celtic *bardo-s.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bardo m (plural bardi)

  1. bard

Verb[edit]

bardo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bardare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bardō

  1. dative singular masculine of bardus
  2. dative singular neuter of bardus
  3. ablative singular masculine of bardus
  4. ablative singular neuter of bardus

Adjective[edit]

bardō m

  1. dative singular of bardus
  2. ablative singular of bardus

References[edit]

  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “bardo”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • bardo in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bьrdo.

Noun[edit]

bardo n

  1. comb (in a loom)

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bardus, from Gaulish, from Proto-Celtic *bardo-s.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bardo m (plural bardos)

  1. bard

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bardus, from Gaulish, from Proto-Celtic *bardo-s.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bardo m (plural bardos)

  1. bard