bard

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See also: Bard, bárd, bàrd, Bård, bård, and barð

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(15th c.) from Scottish Gaelic bàrd, from Old Irish bard, from Proto-Celtic *bardos (bard, poet), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷerH- (praise), and reinforced by Latin bardus, borrowed from Celtic. Cognate with Latin grātus (grateful, pleasant, delightful), Sanskrit गृणाति (gṛṇāti, calls, praises), Old Church Slavonic жрьти (žrĭti, to sacrifice).

Noun[edit]

bard (plural bards)

  1. A professional poet and singer, like among the ancient Celts, whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men.
  2. (by extension) A poet.
    Shakespeare is known as the bard of Avon.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French barde. English since the late 15th century.

Noun[edit]

bard (plural bards)

  1. A piece of defensive (or, sometimes, ornamental) armor for a horse's neck, breast, and flanks; a barb. (Often in the plural.)
  2. Defensive armor formerly worn by a man at arms.
  3. (cooking) A thin slice of fat bacon used to cover any meat or game.
  4. The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind.
  5. Specifically, Peruvian bark.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bard (third-person singular simple present bards, present participle barding, simple past and past participle barded)

  1. To cover a horse in defensive armor.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 29:
      The defensive armor with which the horses of the ancient knights or men at arms were covered, or, to use the language of the time, barded, consisted of the following pieces made either of metal or jacked leather, the Chamfron, Chamfrein or Shaffron, the Criniere or Main Facre, the Poitrenal, Poitral or Breast Plate, and the Croupiere or Buttock Piece.
  2. (cooking) To cover (meat or game) with a thin slice of fat bacon.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

bard m (plural bards)

  1. bard (a professional poet and singer, like among the ancient Celts)

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed either from German Barde or English bard. Ultimately from Proto-Celtic *bardos (bard, poet), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷerH- (praise). Cognate with Latin grātus (grateful, pleasant, delightful), Sanskrit गृणाति (gṛṇāti, calls, praises), Old Church Slavonic жрьти (žrĭti, to sacrifice).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bard m (plural barden)

  1. bard, Celtic poet, singer

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French bard, from Old French béart, bayart, baiart, boieart, boyart, bayard (stretcher), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from unattested *berard, from Frankish *berhard (carrier), from Frankish *beran (to carry) + *-hard.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bard m (plural bards)

  1. (dated) A sort of stretcher, with no wheels, used for transporting materials
  2. (dated) A sawhorse

Synonyms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bard, from Proto-Celtic *bardos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bard m (genitive singular baird, nominative plural baird)

  1. poet (of a certain rank); bard
  2. scold

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bard bhard mbard
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Ludian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *parta, borrowed from Proto-Balto-Slavic *bardā́ˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰardʰéh₂.

Noun[edit]

bard

  1. beard

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic بَرْد(bard).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bard m (plural brud)

  1. cold; cold weather

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bard, from Proto-Celtic *bardos.

Noun[edit]

bard m (genitive singular ?, plural bardyn)

  1. bard
  2. poet

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bard vard mard
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse barð.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bard m (definite singular barden, indefinite plural bardar, definite plural bardane)

  1. a edge, rim, (river)bank

Further reading[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *bardos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bard m (genitive baird, nominative plural baird)

  1. bard
  2. poet

Inflection[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative bard bardL bairdL
Vocative baird bardL barduH
Accusative bardN bardL barduH
Genitive bairdL bard bardN
Dative bardL bardaib bardaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: bard
  • Manx: bard
  • Scottish Gaelic: bàrd

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
bard bard
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mbard
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Scottish Gaelic bàrd, from Old Irish bard.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bard m pers

  1. poet, songster
    Synonyms: poeta, piewca, wieszcz
  2. (historical) bard (professional Celtic poet and singer whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • bard in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bard in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *parta, borrowed from Proto-Balto-Slavic *bardā́ˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰardʰéh₂.

Noun[edit]

bard

  1. beard