coto

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Coto and cotó

Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia *cŏtto-, probably from Proto-Celtic *kotto-, meaning "old" and hence either "grown" or "bent".[1][2][3] Cognate with Asturian cueto.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkoto̝/, /ˈkɔto̝/

Noun[edit]

coto m (plural cotos)

  1. peak (the top, or one of the tops, of a hill, mountain, or range)
    Synonyms: bico, outeiro, penedo, pico
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown. Compare toco.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkoto̝/, /ˈkɔto̝/

Noun[edit]

coto m (plural cotos, feminine cota, feminine plural cotas)

  1. stump (of a tree or plant)
    Synonyms: cepo, cotón, couce, cozo, toco, trocho
  2. stump (of an extremity)
    Synonym: toco
Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

coto m (feminine singular cota, masculine plural cotos, feminine plural cotas)

  1. maimed; mutilated
    Synonyms: fanado, mutilado

References[edit]

  • coto” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • coto” in Santamarina, Antón (dir.), Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja: Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega (v 4.0). Santiago: ILG.
  • coto” in Santamarina, Antón (dir.), Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja: Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega (v 4.0). Santiago: ILG.
  • coto” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ García Trabazo, José Virgilio (2016), “Prelatin Toponymy of Asturies: a critical review in a historical-comparative perspective”, in Lletres Asturianes[1], issue 115, retrieved 14 June 2018, pages 51-71.
  2. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 218-219.
  3. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997). Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico. Madrid: Gredos, s.v. cueto.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the archaic verb coitare (to think).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈko.to/, [ˈkoːt̪o]
  • Hyphenation: có‧to

Noun[edit]

coto m (plural coti)

  1. (archaic) thought, opinion
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno [The Divine Comedy: Hell] (paperback, in Italian), 12th edition, Le Monnier, published 1994, Canto XXXI, lines 76–78, page 459–460:
      Poi disse a me: «Elli stessi s'accusa; ¶ questi è Nembrotto, per lo cui mal coto ¶ pur un linguaggio nel mondo non s'usa. [] »
      Then said to me: "He doth himself accuse; ¶ this one is Nimrod, by whose evil thought ¶ one language in the world is not still used."
    Synonyms: pensiero, giudizio

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

coto

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of cotar

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkoto/, [ˈkot̪o]
  • Hyphenation: co‧to

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cautus (safe, secure).

Noun[edit]

coto m (plural cotos)

  1. enclosed area of land
  2. landmark
  3. wildlife preserve; land preserve
  4. limit, boundary
  5. howler monkey
    Synonyms: cotomono, araguato, carayá, mono aullador
  6. (obsolete) mandate

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From New Latin cottus, from Ancient Greek κόττος (kóttos).

Noun[edit]

coto m (plural cotos)

  1. sculpin (fish)

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Quechua koto (mumps, goiter).

Noun[edit]

coto m (plural cotos)

  1. (Latin America) goitre

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]